Tag Archives: trainers

NEW: INDUSTRY SERVICES FEATURE

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** BREAKING NEWS **

Horse Scout has just launched its new Industry Services feature!

If you’re a vet, farrier, dentist, chiropractor, osteopath, saddle fitter, physical therapist, horse transporter, sports psychologist or any other equestrian related service provider, then this is for YOU!

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“Horse Scout have provided me a professional and courteous service in advertising and propelling my business to all audiences within equestrianism.

I am already seeing the benefits!”

Aidan Paterson, Paterson Equine Dental

Generate NEW Business

Your profile on Horse Scout will allow you to…

  • Attract new clients
  • Showcase your service(s) or profession
  • Network with other equestrian professionals
  • Follow and connect with top names in the industry

We have thousands of members searching Horse Scout daily…
Create your profile and get yourself known

 

We are supported and endorsed by industry leaders- Oliver Townend, Ibby Macpherson, Giovanni Ugolotti, John Whittaker, William Funnell and the Billy Stud and many more top names. We are proud of our content, customers and their horses.

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The Horse Scout community:

  • Professional riders
  • Coaches/trainers
  • Yard/stud profiles
  • Grooms
  • NEW industry services (physiotherapists, dentists, vets, farriers, saddle fitters etc)

What does it cost?

Your monthly listing is just £35 per month (it will pay for itself in just one booking!)

SPECIAL OFFER to New Customers…
For a limited period of time only we are offering discount of £10 per month for the first three months*. That means for just £25 per month (80p per day) you can get your services seen by 1000′s of equestrian professionals.

*Minimum term is three months

Get going in three easy steps...

1. Choose your sign in details by clicking here

2. Complete your profile

3. Pay to go live and get new customers

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

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Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

The advantages of buying form a professional Trader is that their reputation rides with you. Top Tips for making right decisions when buying a horse.

Many of Horse Scouts Professional Trainers and riders also sell horses. Generally they buy in or breed horses which they train and compete before selling on. Sometimes they do the same with horses owned by sponsors or clients. This is true across all disciplines, Eventing, Showjumping, Dressage, Showing and Endurance etc. This is part of their business.   Their skill is in being able to make the most of a horse, to optimise its potential at whatever level. You can be sure that a young horse will have had the best start to its training, a horse with competitive potential will have been carefully progressed and given the right opportunities and in the case of rehabilitation or retraining a horse will be back on track and ready to go on to lead a happy useful life.

When horses do well in their competitive arena (or, if they are new to the discipline or young, they will be gaining experience at grass roots level) with a top trainer on board, their successes are a reflection of the trainers skill and reputation. Horses which are bought to the market fit for purpose help a professional trader build a reputation and repeat custom. It is not in the interest of a professional rider to produce horses which are going to fail to support their business by being suitable for purpose.   Professional riders have the skill and experience to ride all sorts of different horses and know how to ensure that each horse is given a prgramme which is right for them.

However as a buyer you also have responsibilities to ensure that a Professional Trader can help you make the right choice when buying a horse.

When you look through the Horses for Sale listings on a site like Horse Scout you certainly have a lot of good horses to choose from.

However, it is fair to say that buyers have an obligation to honestly represent their skill level, the accommodations they can offer a horse, and their intentions to the seller they are contacting.

There are certainly an infinite number of tales that illustrate less than ideal partnerships but to be fair to the sellers it can come down to the failure of the buyers to asses their own situation or communicate honestly with the seller. Remember that no horse is ever “finished.” They are sensitive creatures that continue to learn new behaviors throughout their lives. A novice horse person can inadvertently “undo” professional training faster than a terrier will snatch and swallow the family hamster. Here are some thoughts about buyers responsibilities.

  1. If you make an appointment to go look at a horse, don’t leave the seller hanging by not turning up. If you can’t make it for some reason, or will be later than scheduled, call your seller. It’s the polite thing to do, after all.
  2. If the horse’s price is more than you want to spend, ask the seller whether it’s negotiable before you make an appointment. If the seller says no, you won’t be wasting your time or his.
  3. Bring your hard hat, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear for riding. Do not assume to wear spur of to carry a whip.
  4. You can ask if it’s okay to bring your own saddle. A seller would need to be sure your saddle is in good repair (intact tree, leather not weak or rotten, etc), and that it fits the horse you are trying. This provides two advantages. You’ll be using tack that’s familiar, and you’ll know whether your saddle fits the horse you’re considering.
  5. Turn your cell phone off while you are trying a horse. It’s rude to take the seller’s time with personal calls and a suddenly ringing phone may frighten the horse.
  6. Do not bring your dog. Many farms have their own dogs, and the sellers won’t appreciate the disruption of yours running around. Also, your dog may chase or injure the seller’s horses, or other animals.
  7. If you have small children and plan to include them, bring along someone to mind the kids while you concentrate on the horse. Unattended children with horses can be extremely dangerous.
  8. Be honest about your abilities and level of riding. If you have an ethical seller, he will want to sell you a suitable horse. If your seller is an experienced horse person, he’ll know pretty quickly how adept you are by watching you with his horse, so don’t fudge; it’s not worth it.
  9. A horse is an individual and frequently develops a relationship with the person who rides it most often. If your seller rides the horse first and the horse seems very well trained, don’t be disappointed if the horse doesn’t perform quite as well when you get on. Even subtle differences in riding technique can produce very different responses from the horse. It may just be a matter of time and a little professional help before you and your new horse become a team.
  10. Don’t be surprised if the seller wants you to begin in a small area, like a paddock or round pen. He may want to assess your skills, for your own safety and for that of the horse. However, be wary of a seller who doesn’t offer a larger area (a ring, arena or pasture) once he’s comfortable with your abilities. Dishonest sellers know that a horse may be fine in a round pen but will bolt for the hills in a open pasture.
  11. Ask the seller about the horse’s daily routine and feeding schedule. A horse that is turned out every day and is eating grass or a little hay could turn into an entirely different horse if you buy it, keep it in a stall and feed it grain. Ask your seller about the level of activity the horse is accustomed to; is it ridden every day, every week, once a month? If you buy a horse that has been worked regularly, but you plan to ride once a month, your horse may not be as easy to handle after a month of leisure. Conversely, if the horse goes from being ridden once a month to your enthusiastic regime of five days a week, the horse may become sore (as you probably will). You’ll go home and relax in your hot tub. Your new horse might buck, rear, kick, toss its head, or refuse to move because that’s the only way it has to indicate pain.
  12. Take note of the bridle and bit used by your seller. Consider buying something similar if the horse works well and seems relaxed.
  13. If you are shopping for a horse for your child, its looks, cosmetic blemishes and color should be the least important factors in choosing. Look for an older horse, and plan to spend more.

Your seller might ask you:

Details of your experience with horses

What sort of support you’ll have; for example, a trainer, a very experienced friend, riding lessons, etc

Horse Scout Bloggers’ Professional Profile Review: Olivia Oakeley.

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From pony club star to international success as Young Rider European Team member in 2012,13 and 14. Now an International dressage rider with 5 European Championships and a BEF World Class Squad member since 2010; Horse Scouts’ newly listed Professional Freelance trainer Olivia Oakeley was bought her fabulous 16hh Dimaggio gelding called Donna Summer, a big moving five year old who had only been backed for three months, when she was just 13. For a 13 yr old child this was a huge ask and many people doubted the purchase! Together, ‘Rio’ and I trained hard and both of us have worked together to show what we can achieve. In 2007 we became Under 21 Novice National Champions and represented BYRDS South West at Home Internationals in Scotland (Novice) and Wales (Medium) where we were Reserve Champions in both competitions. During the next couple of years, Rio and I continued to work hard alongside my school work.

on Olivias’ website bio she goes on to say:

In 2009 after I finished my GCSEs, I was lucky enough to go to Carl Hester’s yard for two weeks, working in return for lessons. Carl asked me to stay on as his working pupil and so at 16 years old having attained 7 A’s and 2 B’s in GCSEs, I left home. Rio and I continued to improve and show success by becoming Advanced Medium Regional Champions. Following that we went on to become Reserve Advanced Medium National Champions. By this point we had been noticed by the British Under 21 selectors and we were put onto the U21 Progress Squad with a view to competing at Junior level in International competitions. We continued to gain good marks in the Junior Team test and were selected to compete for Great Britain at Addington CDI in April 2010. We came 5th in the Team test and were the highest placed British combination. From there, we were sent to Moorsele, Belgium where we came 11th in the Team Test and improving to 11th in the Individual Test.

The peak of our success was in 2010, when we were selected for the Junior European Team in Kronberg, Germany. We were to be the pathfinders of the team and ended up with an international personal best of 67.24% in 16th place in the team test and the 2nd highest placed British rider with the Team coming 5th. 2011 brought great news as Donna Summer and I were selected for World Class Potential Start Squad. This is huge recognition for us both and we will endeavour to keep on improving and being successful.

In 2011, I was selected for the Junior European Team and then the Young Rider European Team in 2012, 2013 and 2014 where I had three personal best scores all over 70% and finished in 5th place. My goal is to be on future Senior Teams. Alongside my competition commitments, I am a freelance rider and trainer whilst also riding for Lordswood Dressage and I still train with Carl Hester. I have been on the BEF World Class programme since 2010.The peak of our success was in 2010, when we were selected for the Junior European Team in Kronberg, Germany. We were to be the pathfinders of the team and ended up with an international personal best of 67.24% in 16th place in the team test and the 2nd highest placed British rider with the Team coming 5th. 2011 brought great news as Donna Summer and I were selected for World Class Potential Start Squad. This is huge recognition for us both and we will endeavour to keep on improving and being successful.

In 2011, I was selected for the Junior European Team and then the Young Rider European Team in 2012, 2013 and 2014 where I had three personal best scores all over 70% and finished in 5th place. My goal is to be on future Senior Teams. Alongside my competition commitments, I am a freelance rider and trainer whilst also riding for Lordswood Dressage and I still train with Carl Hester. I have been on the BEF World Class programme since 2010.

Operating ofrom her glousestershire base, Olivia Offers a freelance training programme for your horse.  Click here to make an enquiry.

Simulated riding sessions – Stay Sober and Smile. Try Leggless at Quob Stables in Hampshire

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Horse Scout Blogger is bouncing today: Well, I wish I was!  Have you ever thought about perfecting your aids or checking how straight you sit?

I was looking at Daisy Jacksons’ Profile on Horse Scout’s Professional Trainers lists and saw that her pyhsio therapists ‘The Balanced Rider’ had Access to a Horse Simulator.

The simulator The Balanced Rider practice use stands at Quob Stables, a smart Equestrian Centre in Hampshire and they offer sessions on “Legless” (brilliant name) for around £35.00. They say that their Dressage Simulator is fun and comfortable to ride. It is ideal to teach riders of all levels, ages and abilities.

The Interactive Dressage Simulator is the most valuable and realistic instructional aid in dressage. It teaches the rider position and control, it develops technique, skill, muscle memory and confidence. It is possible to complete the test and then play it back on the screen

The Advantages listed for riding a simulator are:

1. For the instructor

  • Close proximity to students when teaching

2. For the rider

  • Safe practice for nervous riders
  • Safe and controlled environment
  • Learn the correct posture in minutes
  • Recover from injury with safe measured steps
  • General fitness

3. For everyone!

  • All weather training

The simulator is the same size as a real horse and its action is very close to the natural feel of a real horse. When riding in the simulated arena, the rider is drawn in to the sensation of actually riding in a real ring.

As a teaching aid to help pin point exactly how to give the aids for new movements or to check that you are applying aids correctly, sitting straight, etc this seems like a gift.  Perhaps it could be a gift for someone you think would benefit from a session with their trainer or one from Quob…I wonder if Daisy Jackson has ever tried it!

Daisy is a professional dressage rider, based in Dorset/Hampshire training her current horse to PSG, competing at Advanced Medium. She was on the GB Junior Squad 2012-2013 with International Grand Prix horse Saint Swithens. She has trained with some impressive professionals herself; squad training with Stephen Clarke and Sandy Phillips, and also top trainers such as Dan Greenwood and Nicola Buchanan. Sshe was selected for the High Performance programme and received training with Olympic riders and international judges including Jennie Loriston-Clarke, Anna Ross Davies and Judy Harvey. Daisy is currently training with Nicola Buchanan, Gareth Hughes and Nicky Barrett. Holds Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence. Training towards UKCC. Available by appointment for training. If you are looking for a trainer in Hampshire contact Nicky here.

for The Balanced Riders practice click here

 

Job Vacancies – Apprentice Grooms or working Pupils Berkshire

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Farley Hall Equestrian Centre in near Swallowfield  in Berkshire. They are looking for dedicated apprentice grooms (through Merrist Wood College) or working pupils looking to sit BHS qualifications. There will be a small amount of riding and the chance to work with some exceptional competition horses and take part with managing training clinics with top coaches.

Apprentices and working pupils are actively encouraged to help the trainers during clinics and to assist with the running of the British Eventing Horse Trials held on the estate.

These positions are live-in.

Farley Hall Equestrian Centre is situated on the Farley Estate, located in the picturesque village of Swallowfield. The yard was first opened in February 2010. The Livery Yard is home to an array of horses and ponies, from happy hackers to advanced competition horses. All of our four-legged friends have their needs individually catered for.

The BHS have recently awarded the Equestrian Centre with a ‘Highly Commended’ status, quoting “I congratulate you on the High Standards of Stable Management and Horse Care throughout your centre, which I’m confident, will be a credit to the BHS Approval Scheme”.

The Farley Team are passionate about horses and all aspects of their daily care, working to the highest standards and striving to improve and expand their knowledge. We have recently been awarded by “Investors in People”. The Farley Estate is home to many other Enterprises. It is able to offer the Equestrian Centre over 1750 acres of Private Estate Hacking which also connects with a large bridleway network, to include the highly sought after Bramshill Forest.

If you are looking for work elsewhere check through our listings on Horse Scout  and you will see a button on the top right hand corner of the Professional Trainers  or Yards  advertisement that says Staff Required.

 

The advantages of buying from professional trainers who sell horses

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Do you or don’t you? Don’t dis dealers.

Are you thinking of buying a horse but slightly overwhelmed by the sheer numbers and descriptions of the horses on offer?  There are distinct advantages when buying from a professional, established horse sales business. No door to door when buying from a horse from a Dealer

What classes a person who sells horses as a dealer?

There is no statutory definition of what makes a dealer a dealer, however when someone sells a horse ‘in the course of business’ and sells more than three horses a year they are classed as traders or dealers.

Spoilt for choice

Unlike buying privately, a dealer is likely to have a large selection of horses of all shapes and sizes making it easier for you to find your perfect partner. It is important that you state exactly what you are looking for and be open and honest with your capabilities. When possible get detailed descriptions of the horses you are looking at in writing – asking them to email is an easy way – and ask what trial facilities they have.

Protection when buying

One of the biggest benefits to buying through a trader or dealer is that once you have established that they are selling the horse in the course of business, you will be protected under the Sale of Goods Act 1979. This means that the goods you buy must be reasonably fit for the purpose for which they are intended, however this purpose must be made known to the seller clearly which is why, if you can, you should get the description of the horse in writing. If the horse you purchase is deemed unsuitable, you may have a claim for breach of contract which means you should be able to return your horse and potentially claim further damages if applicable.

Some well established dealers may have their own warranty and terms and conditions of sale, often these can be found on their website. You should always make sure you have read them carefully before buying a horse from them – in the event of a problem it may be deemed that you have read them and they could form as part of the terms of sale.

Our top tips for buying from a dealer or trader

Never buy a horse unseen, you can’t get a true feeling for what you are buying from images and video clips alone. Even if they are a long distance away it is worth travelling to see them to save you the heartache and stress of purchasing an unsuitable horse.

Go to a dealer based on recommendations and word of mouth, not just based on their own testimonials on their website. Look online and in forums to get some real references and if you can chat to previous clients – an honest dealer won’t have a problem with you contacting previous buyers.

Don’t be pressured by the sales person. They may tell you that they have other people coming to see the horse later that day to push for a quick sale. Give yourself time to think and ensure your decision is the right one, don’t feel rushed.

Always take a knowledgeable person with you when you go to view and try a horse, if you are inexperienced take someone who is willing to ride the horse as well to get a better idea of whether it is suitable. If you aren’t confident to try out a horse be honest and say, don’t feel pressured in to it, the seller would rather you were honest than waste their time.

Be wary if the horse is tacked up when you get there, it could be a sign that it is cold backed or difficult to tack up, also look for signs that it has already been ridden that day.

Always see the horse ridden before you get on.

Watch the horse in the stable to check they have no vices such as wind sucking or weaving.

Ask if you can have the horse on trial, or can come back and see the horse on a different day, try first thing in the morning when it could be at its freshest.

Always get the horse vetted yourself and don’t accept a vet certificate from the dealer.

If a dealer comes with recommendations and a good reputation then there are many good reasons for looking for a horse being sold by a dealer.  The truth is that whilst the word ‘dealer’ may have unwarranted connotations of dastardly deeds and double dealing, the truth is that dealers are running a business and that a bad reputation is bad for business.

Horse Scout has quite a few listed dealers and the re is bound to be a centre near you.  Take a look at their profiles.

 

Andrea Verdina – Hungerford, Wilts

Oliver Townend – Ellesmere, Shropshire

Aqua Rask – Carrington, Greater Manchester

Peter White – Basingstoke, Hampshire

Lucienne Elms – Romsey, Hampshire

Jess Butler – Melton Mowbray, Leics

Connie Hannaway – Armagh, Armagh

Gregor Knox – Northleach, Gloucestershire

Luis Principe – Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Michelle Walker – Congleton, Cheshire

Lucca Stubington – Antrim, Antrim

 

Professional Profile – Lucinda Fredericks

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Eventing Olympian Lucinda Fredericks is an international trainer and travels extensively to give clinics and demonstrations as well as hosting training sessions at her own venue, Rosegarth, near Devizes view her Horse Scout Profile HERE!

How special would it be to buy the rider in your life a gift voucher for a private session with Lucinda Fredericks?

Her schedule for clinics for this year shows that she is in Hong Kong  at the end of a five day marathon of 5 days clinics and training out there.  As an official trainer of the Hong Kong Event Team, who took Bronze at the Eventing in the  17th Asian Games in 2014 (well done them!) On this trip she has been training the riders on horses which are retired from the Hong Kong Racing Circuit and she says how proud she was of the young racehorses retraining at her clinic (yesterday) in Teun Mun as they jump happily over 110m. And at this moment (according to her Facebook profile) she is putting a very handsome chestnut retiree through its paces over some XC jumps at Beas River Equestrian Centre.

Her experience and support of the Retraining of Reacehorses was also demonstrated at the The Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Centre  near Preston who have some fantastic pictures, taken by Trevor Holt and Ashley Stewart of a demonstration she hosted to a crowd of around 300 people in April – the event raised around £3,000 for the TRC.

With so many awards for Retraining of  Racehorses perhaps a group of individual training session with Lucinda on your own retired racehorse would help you along the way to one of the awards being offered by ROR Grassroots Eventing Series for 2015

There may be time to book places at the clinic at Charlotte Wadley Equestrian, Painswick, on the 7th February . (Individual spaces cost £60 + VAT (within a group of 4). Alternatively you can contact Lucinda’s team through Horse Scout to arrange for a session at her training centre.

She is holding clinics in February in  Holland  and Dorset, March in Berkshire and then she is back out to Hong Kong at the beginning of April

If you cant wait that long to see Lucinda then she will be talking about her Olympic experiences with Headley Britannia and Flying Finish, at the Equine Client Meeting in Frome at 7.30 pm on Wednesday 25th February being orgainised by Garston vets.

 

 

Horse experience for a novice rider

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When searching for a competition horse, common mistakes lay in the misconception that a potential horse will fit the bill. If you have not yet had competition mileage / experience it is best to buy a horse that knows it’s job.

Take an experienced professional /trainer with you who understands your requirements and is able to help you stay safe, ask the right questions, and ultimately know that your capable of jumping, or hacking the horse in question to minimise risk.

A horse with jumping experience will generally be more forgiving and help get you out of trouble, than a green (younger/ less experienced) one.

Best see proof of experience, by affiliated results, facts, videos, than take a vendors word for it!

Rider balance when training the horse

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There is an increasing awareness that horse and rider should not be asymmetric. The ever expanding research in balance, biomechanics, and musculoskeletal impact upon the horse and rider combination is vast. Training horses to move freely without the riders influencing movement & freedom is a hard task. Professional trainers and coaches http://www.horsescout.co.uk/professionalswill be able to help you identify which rein your restricted on, this is very important in the both the horses and your own development with flatwork and jumping respectively . Horses with one sided development often present with an ‘unstraightness’ during jumping exercises. Until straightness can be achieved the horse and rider should be careful not to focus on height , but quality of the canter , replicability of the jump & straightness.