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Finding a dressage horse with Liz Diegutis

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Finding a dressage horse with Liz Diegutis

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“It’s about temperament and rideability. Breeding and looks are of secondary importance” says International Dressage rider and trainer Liz Diegutis.

Whether Liz is looking for a potential Grand Prix horse for herself or a schoolmaster for an amateur, she believes that the horse’s temperament should be top of the list.

“They need a trainable brain. A horse who likes to work makes the job much easier.” For top level sport, Liz explains that whilst they need some spirit to give them a presence, if it is “over the top” it is likely to problematic. “They need a good natural engine but they must be rideable. People blame breeding and certain bloodlines but I think this usually goes down to how well it has been trained. I have bought horses with all the talent but if they are anxious or too hot, they require a lot of patience and expertise and sometimes it never comes right.”

“The most important thing for any rider, is to look for something within you abilities. If you buy talent, then you have to be able to manage it. You must have a good feeling for it. Don’t sit on a horse and think. “I’ll learn to ride this”.”

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Liz is also wary of spectacular paces, for any level of rider. “I avoid massive paces because they often come with problems” Liz says. “Particularly when you are trying to collect a pace. Look for three good paces, they certainly don’t have to be extraordinary particularly for an amateur. I look for a good four beat walk and a natural jump in the canter. The trot can be produced and developed. In fact I have a homebred mare who perhaps didn’t have the best canter as a young horse but we have trained the pace. She is at Grand Prix now.”

Buying British is something Liz feels strongly about. “ We have some brilliant studs in the UK now who are breeding and producing some fabulous stock. There are many examples all around the country but I have been particularly impressed by Court Farm Stud, Mount St John, Caledonia Sport Horses in Scotland and the Oppenheimer’s at Headmore Stud in Hampshire.”

“I also think you can usually trust the UK sellers and breeders more than foreign sellers. I was based on the Continent for a few years and I know how it works. If you choose to go abroad, you have to know where to go and who to trust. Wherever you go I think you should always take someone with you. Preferably more experienced than yourself and ideally someone who will sit on the horse for you too and give their verdict on top.”

Liz is less fussed about bloodlines when she is buying a horse but as she breeds her own, she has a wealth of experience in the area. “I go for old, established bloodlines like De Niro and Negro and I’ve always been a fan of Sandro Hit. They have a reputation for being tricky but if you understand their brain, they can be brilliant. Of course the mare is the important bit, so you need to look at that side too. I only breed from a good mare.”

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Conformation is not a deal breaker for Liz but she does have three rules on this. “Good bone, good feet and straight limbs” she states. “The rest, like length of back I can overlook, if it gives me a good feel. Dressage horses come in all shapes and sizes, even at Grand Prix level. To be competitive I would always buy something that is attractive to the Judge but that is not just about looks.”

An over-produced horse should also be avoided. “I don’t like to see a three year old that looks like a five year old, simply because it has been over fed and over trained. This will nearly always result in issues later. As my aim is Grand Prix, if I am buying a youngster, I like something that has been slowly produced. With my homebreds, they live out rough for the first three years of their lives before they come in to be broken. Then if they are any good, I take it very slowly.”

 

Written by Ellie Kelly

 

Photography by Stuart Lark

 

 

Riding tools and tips from our professionals

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One major riding tool your trainer is trying to teach you

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Hi, I’m Stephen Hayes, FEI Dressage Rider and trainer from Great Britain, based in New York and Florida, USA. This is an article I’ve felt brewing for a while now, having taught many clinics around the world I feel like I’ve had a really good share of many different types rider, there is the brave and bold, the shy and timid, the rider that has a little devil on their shoulder constantly tearing them apart, the rider who attends my clinic already knowing everything there is to know about Dressage (even the best of the best will admit there is lifetimes of more knowledge to be learnt), there are the diamonds in the rough, the adult amateurs who put their heart and soul into every second in the saddle, the die hard professionals, riders triple my age and being an amazing role model. There isn’t a day that I’m not trying to improve my teaching style and methods, but there is always a couple of subjects which replay time after time in each clinic. Here is just one!‘BUT IM NOT SUPPOSED TO USE MY INSIDE REIN? I FEEL LIKE IM BEING ROUGH WITH MY HANDS, AM I PULLING HIM? I NEED TO BE LIGHTER WITH MY HANDS, BUT I CANT GET HIM ROUND ENOUGH HE’S TOO STRONG’Then I go on to explain the followingContact is such a massive and wide ranging word in dressage, and that’s why Dressage is so beneficial to all Equestrian sports. Contact is such an important and beautiful aid that many riders are not taking full advantage of or on the other hand abusing. Contact is very similar to a loaded gun, used correctly and in a positive and productive way it’s a VERY useful tool. Used in a negative way, then a loaded gun is no longer a useful tool. I’m sure we have all seen a situation where the contact is being abused, that’s easy to notice, but I’m going to talk about the opposite end of the scale, which are much more humane scenarios to the horse, but are still not beneficial to the horses physical and mental well being as the rider is still not truly connecting with their horse through the reins.

I have seen riders so brainwashed to avoid using their inside rein that their literally riding around the arena in constant counter flexion. A riders inside leg absolutely creates bend but if your not at all touching your inside rein… ever… Then how the hell can we expect the horse to be truly flexed around a circle/pirouette/half-pass the list goes on. The inside rein is an ingredient that you NEED, direct the neck to correct flexion, and let your inside leg be a boundary like he’s walking around a lamp post, use the inside rein in conjunction with your inside leg and outside half halt. It’s a balancing act of the three aids. Of course don’t abuse the inside rein but certainly don’t avoid it altogether.

There is SO much to cover on contact, I could have you here all day but one last thing. Giving and taking of the reins, the whole concept of a release of a particular rein or both is a reward. I see people giving and taking every milli second. Do you give your dog a treat if he’s dragging you around the park? Do you give your dog a treat if he’s jumping up at you if your asking him to sit? Are you feeding your dog a treat every second as he’s sitting down or do you let him sit and wait there are few moments till he’s earned the reward. You see where I’m going with this?

​You are your horses teacher, the ‘give’ is when your horse has yielded to the contact and is chewing and suckling the bit. Not when he’s ripping your shoulders out their sockets. That’s not to say Im asking my riders to stay on the end of the rein like a brick house, of course not, you have to be productive. I want my riders massaging and manipulating the corners/bars of the horses mouth through a consistent contact, until the horse decides to unlock and let go of his jaw/poll/neck while moving forwards and sideways from his riders leg aids. That is then your window to reward, he’s going to love the feeling of being relaxed and loose in his poll, throat lash area and neck, thousands of endorphins are being released while doing so, and in return you push forward your hands from his wither for a moment. That’s the real idea of a give. That’s how he will learn to want to soften to your hands, he’ll eventually understand that your hand is guiding him to a better place, now your hand has become a friend, and it’s being productive to your horses mindset. He will no doubt begin to follow your lead. Unfortunately horses don’t read a book at night on ‘how to become more supple’ they have NO idea unless we show them the way, and one way in conjunction with other aspects is through your HANDS. So don’t be afraid of the contact, it’s a beautiful thing once being used correctly.

Written by Stephen Hayes
Photo credits Amanda Diefenbach
Stephen Hayes riding Alfonso owned by Caroline McConnel

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NEW: INDUSTRY SERVICES FEATURE

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** BREAKING NEWS **

Horse Scout has just launched its new Industry Services feature!

If you’re a vet, farrier, dentist, chiropractor, osteopath, saddle fitter, physical therapist, horse transporter, sports psychologist or any other equestrian related service provider, then this is for YOU!

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“Horse Scout have provided me a professional and courteous service in advertising and propelling my business to all audiences within equestrianism.

I am already seeing the benefits!”

Aidan Paterson, Paterson Equine Dental

Generate NEW Business

Your profile on Horse Scout will allow you to…

  • Attract new clients
  • Showcase your service(s) or profession
  • Network with other equestrian professionals
  • Follow and connect with top names in the industry

We have thousands of members searching Horse Scout daily…
Create your profile and get yourself known

 

We are supported and endorsed by industry leaders- Oliver Townend, Ibby Macpherson, Giovanni Ugolotti, John Whittaker, William Funnell and the Billy Stud and many more top names. We are proud of our content, customers and their horses.

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The Horse Scout community:

  • Professional riders
  • Coaches/trainers
  • Yard/stud profiles
  • Grooms
  • NEW industry services (physiotherapists, dentists, vets, farriers, saddle fitters etc)

What does it cost?

Your monthly listing is just £35 per month (it will pay for itself in just one booking!)

SPECIAL OFFER to New Customers…
For a limited period of time only we are offering discount of £10 per month for the first three months*. That means for just £25 per month (80p per day) you can get your services seen by 1000′s of equestrian professionals.

*Minimum term is three months

Get going in three easy steps...

1. Choose your sign in details by clicking here

2. Complete your profile

3. Pay to go live and get new customers

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

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Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

The advantages of buying form a professional Trader is that their reputation rides with you. Top Tips for making right decisions when buying a horse.

Many of Horse Scouts Professional Trainers and riders also sell horses. Generally they buy in or breed horses which they train and compete before selling on. Sometimes they do the same with horses owned by sponsors or clients. This is true across all disciplines, Eventing, Showjumping, Dressage, Showing and Endurance etc. This is part of their business.   Their skill is in being able to make the most of a horse, to optimise its potential at whatever level. You can be sure that a young horse will have had the best start to its training, a horse with competitive potential will have been carefully progressed and given the right opportunities and in the case of rehabilitation or retraining a horse will be back on track and ready to go on to lead a happy useful life.

When horses do well in their competitive arena (or, if they are new to the discipline or young, they will be gaining experience at grass roots level) with a top trainer on board, their successes are a reflection of the trainers skill and reputation. Horses which are bought to the market fit for purpose help a professional trader build a reputation and repeat custom. It is not in the interest of a professional rider to produce horses which are going to fail to support their business by being suitable for purpose.   Professional riders have the skill and experience to ride all sorts of different horses and know how to ensure that each horse is given a prgramme which is right for them.

However as a buyer you also have responsibilities to ensure that a Professional Trader can help you make the right choice when buying a horse.

When you look through the Horses for Sale listings on a site like Horse Scout you certainly have a lot of good horses to choose from.

However, it is fair to say that buyers have an obligation to honestly represent their skill level, the accommodations they can offer a horse, and their intentions to the seller they are contacting.

There are certainly an infinite number of tales that illustrate less than ideal partnerships but to be fair to the sellers it can come down to the failure of the buyers to asses their own situation or communicate honestly with the seller. Remember that no horse is ever “finished.” They are sensitive creatures that continue to learn new behaviors throughout their lives. A novice horse person can inadvertently “undo” professional training faster than a terrier will snatch and swallow the family hamster. Here are some thoughts about buyers responsibilities.

  1. If you make an appointment to go look at a horse, don’t leave the seller hanging by not turning up. If you can’t make it for some reason, or will be later than scheduled, call your seller. It’s the polite thing to do, after all.
  2. If the horse’s price is more than you want to spend, ask the seller whether it’s negotiable before you make an appointment. If the seller says no, you won’t be wasting your time or his.
  3. Bring your hard hat, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear for riding. Do not assume to wear spur of to carry a whip.
  4. You can ask if it’s okay to bring your own saddle. A seller would need to be sure your saddle is in good repair (intact tree, leather not weak or rotten, etc), and that it fits the horse you are trying. This provides two advantages. You’ll be using tack that’s familiar, and you’ll know whether your saddle fits the horse you’re considering.
  5. Turn your cell phone off while you are trying a horse. It’s rude to take the seller’s time with personal calls and a suddenly ringing phone may frighten the horse.
  6. Do not bring your dog. Many farms have their own dogs, and the sellers won’t appreciate the disruption of yours running around. Also, your dog may chase or injure the seller’s horses, or other animals.
  7. If you have small children and plan to include them, bring along someone to mind the kids while you concentrate on the horse. Unattended children with horses can be extremely dangerous.
  8. Be honest about your abilities and level of riding. If you have an ethical seller, he will want to sell you a suitable horse. If your seller is an experienced horse person, he’ll know pretty quickly how adept you are by watching you with his horse, so don’t fudge; it’s not worth it.
  9. A horse is an individual and frequently develops a relationship with the person who rides it most often. If your seller rides the horse first and the horse seems very well trained, don’t be disappointed if the horse doesn’t perform quite as well when you get on. Even subtle differences in riding technique can produce very different responses from the horse. It may just be a matter of time and a little professional help before you and your new horse become a team.
  10. Don’t be surprised if the seller wants you to begin in a small area, like a paddock or round pen. He may want to assess your skills, for your own safety and for that of the horse. However, be wary of a seller who doesn’t offer a larger area (a ring, arena or pasture) once he’s comfortable with your abilities. Dishonest sellers know that a horse may be fine in a round pen but will bolt for the hills in a open pasture.
  11. Ask the seller about the horse’s daily routine and feeding schedule. A horse that is turned out every day and is eating grass or a little hay could turn into an entirely different horse if you buy it, keep it in a stall and feed it grain. Ask your seller about the level of activity the horse is accustomed to; is it ridden every day, every week, once a month? If you buy a horse that has been worked regularly, but you plan to ride once a month, your horse may not be as easy to handle after a month of leisure. Conversely, if the horse goes from being ridden once a month to your enthusiastic regime of five days a week, the horse may become sore (as you probably will). You’ll go home and relax in your hot tub. Your new horse might buck, rear, kick, toss its head, or refuse to move because that’s the only way it has to indicate pain.
  12. Take note of the bridle and bit used by your seller. Consider buying something similar if the horse works well and seems relaxed.
  13. If you are shopping for a horse for your child, its looks, cosmetic blemishes and color should be the least important factors in choosing. Look for an older horse, and plan to spend more.

Your seller might ask you:

Details of your experience with horses

What sort of support you’ll have; for example, a trainer, a very experienced friend, riding lessons, etc

Going Dutch? – Opportunity for Living and Learning with Ron Smeets in Holland

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Learning and living in Holland with Ron Smeets Dressage Horses There are many different programmes available at Ron Smeets dressage horses in Hulsberg , Limburg. Trainer Ron Smeets is a FEI Grand Prix rider for almost 20 years and is offering a fantastic opportunity to a working pupil to join his team in Hulsberg, Limburg. He says on his Horse Scout profile, “We offer a simple boarding/ livery with a lesson or training session included once a week. We also take horses at all levels for training; from breaking to Grand Prix. With a wide range of international clients and contacts, you can also place your horse with us to be sold” He says that their working student program focuses on teaching training techniques and philosophies of dressage and barn management. This program* helps the rider learn to “train” and not just to “ride” horses. We invest a lot of time every day in training and developing our working students as professional riders. Working students will be provided with full room and board along with meals. References are available from previous working students. Please note that this is not a program for a novice rider. ‘Ron Smeets Dressage’ provides quality top horses that are sold around the world. Ron Smeets started his riding career training with Sjef Janssen (trainer of Anky van Grunsven, and he is currently training the Dutch Dressage Team). He became extremely successful at a young age showing in many different national and international competitions. At 18 years old he joined Young Riders and competed with them till the age of 21, representing Holland in many different international competitions. Now Ron has been a Gold Medal rider for 20 years. Currently he is focused on his training, selling, and breeding programs at home. He travels several times a year to teach clinics in various places in the United States as well as England. Charlotte Osborne – is currently the yard manager and rider at the fantastic private dressage barn in the south of Holland where Ron Smeets is based.

Horse Scout International Listings – Professional livery and training facilities even in Egypt

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Horse Scout International  Listings – Professional livery and training facilities even in Egypt

Are you thinking of visiting Egypt and want to do some riding while you are there, The Stallion Centre sounds wonderful.  Below is a piece taken from their website describing their facilities and where they are situated.

“Stallion Equestrian Center” is a specialised private center for teaching horse back riding at any stage for children & adults. it offers a high standard of training, it aims to develop highly qualified new riders and fulfill all riding disciplines and interests including Beginners Lessons, Dressage Lessons & Jumping Lessons.

The perfect choice for those who love nature, by providing them with the opportunity to observe the great beauty of Sakkara desert, and Wadi el Rayan’s beautiful lakes and desert ,our overnight trips to the old roman village and gold British mine situated between the mountains of Hurghada and other trips to explore the magnificent nature among the mountains of Sharm El Sheikh.

We have started our own horseback-riding dream by building our first private Equestrian Center in Ahmed Orabi. Over the past few years, the owner and trainer, Mr. Mohamed Khalifa, managed to develop a strong foundation with beautiful well trained horses, cozy, comfortable atmosphere, and well equipped stables with modern facilities.

Stallion Equestrian” Center started by establishing it’s first facility located in Ahmed Orabi, Cairo- Ismailia Desert Road with only 8 stables, 1 paddock, a lunging area, and 5 riders. It was known since then to be a very welcoming, safe, and dedicated place for teaching young children the art of horsemanship.

The owner, Mohamed Khalifa comes from a family of horsemen deeply involved in the horse world. He started riding at the age of five in Feroseiah club. Then, by the age of fifteen he joined the Armed Forces show jumping team.

He was one of the pioneers who understood the importance of private centers to the sport. Until the 1990′s all sports were only available in big clubs, where memberships are usually very expensive and hard to get. Then people started to be interested in private centers specialized in specific sports like tennis, bowling, golf, and horseback riding.

Being the pioneers in establishing the first private Equestrian Center specialized only in the equestrian field in Egypt gave us the confidence over the past few years, to develop a strong foundation withbeautiful well trained horses, cozy comfortable atmosphere, and well equipped stables with modern facilities. “Stallion Equestrian Center” is not only for beginner children! Adults as well are offered training at all levels.

Improvements in the center were done by Phases. Phase one we increased the number of stables to 34 second phase we added the Royal Stables , which consists of 13 box, tack room, washing area, separate food storage, trainer residence, grooming box, one lunge and a lightened riding arena. Third phase we added the Arabian Stud, which consist of two stables one for breeding (9 boxes) and the second for raising(8 boxes) including boarding for grooms & storage.

“Stallion Equestrian Center” has become a second home for all its riders. The families love to go there enjoy the sport and the homey environment. They all grew to be a big family celebrating most of their occasions there, with parties and barbecues!

Professional Profile – Alison Kenward

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Looking for a Clinic in Oxfordshire? – Alison Kenward

Alison Kenward is a trainer and professional competition rider based in Oxfordshire. She competes her horses Roughway Jack at medium and advanced medium level. Alison is a BHS Stable Manager, Intermediate Instructor and UKCC 3 coach.

A professional Trainer she has 21 years of experience helping riders to develop a partnership with their horse (s). It is important to her that training sessions are enjoyed by both the “athletes” and that every session sees development.

Psssst!….check out Horse Scouts blog on Core Fitness

She runs regular clinics in Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire. There is a varied clinic programme including test riding, riding to music, jumping and pole work. Alison coaches riders of all ages and abilities as well as training horses on the flat and over fences to Medium level Dressage, Novice Horse Trials & Newcomers Showjumping. Alison teaches private lessons lasting 45 minutes and group lessons lasting an hour. Alison also offers complete freestyle design & choreography clinics with Nick Reeve. Alison coaches teams for BD TeamQuest and is helping riders to prepare for the Pet Plan Area Festival series as well as the BD Summer & Winter competitions. Riders are welcome to come to Solitaire HQ for training, overnight and day stabling is available.

Please get in touch to discuss training with Alison and joining the Solitaire Riders Team.

Alison is currently a BD Group 5 rider and trains with Emile Faurie. Her horses are based at a private yard in Warwickshire and are looked after by Alison and her Mother, Helen and is preparing for the BD Summer Season 2015. Good Luck to Alison.

If you are looking for a trainer to help you Alison definitely sounds like a lady who can help.

Horse Scouts 6 Top Tips – Warming up from the ground

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What is a warm-up? The term ‘warm-up’ accurately describes what happens when we transition the body from a resting state to a state suitable for activity: the muscles are literally ‘warmed up’, receive increased blood and oxygen supply, gain flexibility and therefore reduce stress on tendons and ligaments.

 

A warm-up will also ensure increased oxygen supply to the blood and the elevation of the heart rate from a resting rate to an activity rate. If you warm up your horse gradually—instead of ‘jump-starting’ his heart-rate—you will also have a calmer, more relaxed, and more willing horse.

 

Sufficient warm up before exercise, training, and competition is essential, in order to avoid injury to muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Our bodies-rider’s and horse’s-are made up of mostly fluids! Warming up body fuids inside muscles reduces the internal friction of a muscle and therefore prevents injury. Mobility and elasticity of muscles is increased, which minimises the strain on ligaments and tendons.

Avoid muscle spasms, discomfort, stiff gaits and in extreme cases torn muscles or tendons or anxiety and unwillingness to work by warming your horse up properly at the beginning of every ride.

Before you even get your horse out of the stable you can start a warm up routine as part of his preparation to be ridden.

Here are 6 top tips to get that blood flowing; the bonus is that it will help get you warmed up too!

  1. A warm up should always start gently.  Getting the blood to start flowing around the body and warming up the muscles. You can start by grooming your horse, and this has an added benefit of giving you the chance to check for injuries and to ensure that all sweat and mud is removed so that it cannot irritate your horse as he starts work.
  1. Having brushed you horse all over start to concentrate on the back area using a technique similar to a Swedish massage, long light stokes using the warmth of your palm and flicking up and away at the end of the stroke.  Its called “Effleurage” you can see graphics on the internet if you search the word. Basically think of it as ironing out the (metaphorical) wrinkles by moulding your palm around the muscles, as you stoke away you will feel a warmth in your hand and he will be feeling the same warmth in his muscles.
  1. Before mounting him walk him around in circles and ask him to walk forward and backwards too.  This will really help if you have a horse with a cold back.
  2. As these movements will help to warm his back muscles up and increase the
  3. blood flow around his whole body.
  1. Finally, before bitting him up, use carrot stretches to help stretch his topline muscles and engage his core muscles. Make sure he has had time to finish his mouthful before setting off. More on carrot stretches later. As these are also excellent at the end of a ride and your horse will love you for feeding him carrots.

When viewing a horse for sale this crucial step is often left out or rushed because of the time element perhaps the seller is a busy yard owner and has to move on to the next sale or job or where buying privately the seller feels rushed because they don’t want to hold you up.  However this could be an important factor in your final decision and it really is best to allow the horse to fully warm up before you get your first impression of him. Perhaps if you go for a second viewing you could ask to take the horse through a full warm up and that way you could also asses his temperament, stable manners, etc from a relaxed and quiet moment or two together, I am sure that if the seller knows you are a serious purchaser they will allow you to do this.

If you are having a training session or clinic with a professional rider then make sure you build in time to do this initial warm up when you arrive, so there is plenty of time to get ready for the start of your lesson.

Mandy Frost holds Show Jumping Clinics at The Mullacott Centre – Mandy Frost is a BS Accredited UKCC Level 3 Coach and Coach of the Year 2009 and also lead coach for Devon Junior Academy as well as being part of the Excel Coaching Programme. As well as competing Nationally. Cost – group of 3 – £20 per person: two sharing – £30 per person: individual -£60

Lucinda Fredericks  Clinics can be organised outside of eventing season. The cost is £1,000 + VAT plus travel expenses. Clinics can be a mix of flatwork, jumping skills or cross country skills or can concentrate on one discipline and can be a mix of group work and private lessons. If you book a 3 day clinic one night can include a video/Talk/Q&A Session and dinner with Lucinda on one of the nights. Lucinda can offer private lessons to individuals or groups from complete beginners right up to advanced competition riders. Lessons can be undertaken at either at Rosegarth or at external locations for more people by booking a clinic day – Lucinda often travels to local XC courses and equestrian centres to offer tuition to small groups. For lessons on site at Rosegarth please note you will need to bring your own horse with you.  Lucinda has two sessions in in Dorset 18 & 28th February 2015 – Her charges are: Individual lessons – £80 for a 45 minute session: Group lesson with 4 people – £35 each for 1 hour: Group lesson for 6 people – £25 each for 1.5 hours charges subject to VAT

 

 

 

5 Work riders with profiles on Horse Scout

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Do you need a hand with your horses?

Here are hard working grooms and work riders who have listings on Horse Scout. If you are looking for someone to help at your stables or with your horse have a look at our Grooms & Work Riders pagesSome of Horse Scouts listed Work Riders and Grooms

Steph Farrar – Sandbach, Cheshire I am a kind, patient and sympathetic rider, specialising in problem horses. I have ridden since the age of four, and loaned and owned horses for many years. I worked with problem horses for around ten years and have had some marked success with a number of troublesome horses, some of which had been deemed ‘unrideable’ by their owners or other riders. From loading worries to spookers to bolshy or aggressive horses, to those are simply young and green, I will try and help. I specialise in jumping, both show jumping and cross country, but am also happy to school in dressage, lungeing, groundwork and join-up/natural horsemanship techniques. If you need a horse or horses exercising, breaking, schooling, competing or problem behaviour resolved. I am based in Cheshire, but will happily cover Staffordshire, Manchester, Derbyshire and more. My rates vary with distance travelled. My references are available upon request. Specialist areas – Breaking & Producing, Eventing, Dressage, Hunting, Show Jumping, Rehabilitation,

Lizzie Norton – Henstridge – I am a freelance groom based in henstridge, Somerset. I work in the Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire area but willing to travel. Am available for all groom duties from day to day duties, short or long term cover, competition grooming plus able to travel to competitions with you, hunt preparation. Also available for all riding aspects. Specialise in breaking in youngsters, difficult horses, retraining of ex racehorses. Able to meet any need in which you have. Specialst areas – Breaking & Producing, Eventing, Dealing, Hunting, Livery – All Types, Show Jumping, Point to Point, Pre-Training Race, Racing – Flat, Racing – Jump, Racing – Dual Purpose, Rehabilitation, Riding Schools, ROR,

Fiona Jopling in Hampshire is a professional groom. She is available and looking for work She is an experienced groom with 20 years expertise. She has a Lorry 7.5 tonne driving license and a valid driving license. She has experience in Backing /Breaking/P2P/ Race horses/exercising youngsters and competition riding (Affiliated) She lists her areas of expertise as Breeding & Stud work, Breaking & Producing, Eventing, Dressage, Driving, Pre-Training Race & Rehabilitation

Becky Forte from Bexhill in East Sussex says she has a high standard of turnout and can trim clip etc. she has good client liaison skills and is easy and professional with her clients. In my past life I have worked with horses from the age of 17 including event horses up to Badminton level where I was sole charge groom and show jumpers to international standard. I have BHS Stage II, Pony Club B+ and have XC trained up to Novice level. At home I am competing Novice level dressage and 80cm SJ (I’m not as brave as I was!) I am currently working full time away from horses and have a family. I have been doing the odd weekend/holiday/show week (i.e. Hickstead) cover and really enjoy it. I am happy to travel and hold a full clean UK driving licence. I have not driven a lorry but as I am older (!!) I have the facility on my licence to drive up to 7.5 tonne and would be happy to do this if required. If you are in the South and need occasional help at shows or at home and would like a sensible, experienced animal loving person to help then please feel free to contact me. I can still plait and trim but my clipping is rusty and I would not be confident doing a complicated clip. I feel it is important to be honest about my capabilities. I am not looking for a further career in horses, I just enjoy grooming and would like to attend the odd show/event and/or help someone out if I am able.

 

Lucinda Fredericks – Working Pupil and Temporary Groom Opportunities

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Are you looking for an opportunity on an eventing yard? Horse Scout has two positions advertised.

Lucinda Fredericks has a new opportunity for a working pupil to join her yard near Devises  with (or without) their horse from March 2015.

Closing date: Friday 20th February 2015 This is a great opportunity for someone wanting to experience life on an International Eventing yard as part of a fantastic and friendly team, whilst developing your own, and your horses career. Case Study: Zoe joined us in August 2014 as a Working Pupil, she has shown herself to be a hardworking member of the team who is quick to learn and is a joy to be around. Due to her commitment and enthusiasm we have worked with her to transfer her onto an apprenticeship scheme and she is now working towards a level 3 qualification with us. Zoe commented “Lucinda is someone I aspire to be like and what more could you want than being at her yard itself. In five years time I see myself and my own horse competing regularly in different disciplines, surrounded by and being part of a determined, hard working team. My ambition is to run my own yard for breaking, schooling and competitive livery”. For full information please see our website here

Lucinda also has a place for a Temporary Full Time Groom – immediate start Position 1: Temporary groom with immediate start We are currently seeking a temporary groom, full time over 6 days to start immediately. This is a great opportunity for someone wanting to gain experience working on an International Eventing yard as part of a fantastic and friendly team. Excellent on site accommodation is available.