Tag Archives: Professional Riders

NEW: INDUSTRY SERVICES FEATURE

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** BREAKING NEWS **

Horse Scout has just launched its new Industry Services feature!

If you’re a vet, farrier, dentist, chiropractor, osteopath, saddle fitter, physical therapist, horse transporter, sports psychologist or any other equestrian related service provider, then this is for YOU!

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“Horse Scout have provided me a professional and courteous service in advertising and propelling my business to all audiences within equestrianism.

I am already seeing the benefits!”

Aidan Paterson, Paterson Equine Dental

Generate NEW Business

Your profile on Horse Scout will allow you to…

  • Attract new clients
  • Showcase your service(s) or profession
  • Network with other equestrian professionals
  • Follow and connect with top names in the industry

We have thousands of members searching Horse Scout daily…
Create your profile and get yourself known

 

We are supported and endorsed by industry leaders- Oliver Townend, Ibby Macpherson, Giovanni Ugolotti, John Whittaker, William Funnell and the Billy Stud and many more top names. We are proud of our content, customers and their horses.

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The Horse Scout community:

  • Professional riders
  • Coaches/trainers
  • Yard/stud profiles
  • Grooms
  • NEW industry services (physiotherapists, dentists, vets, farriers, saddle fitters etc)

What does it cost?

Your monthly listing is just £35 per month (it will pay for itself in just one booking!)

SPECIAL OFFER to New Customers…
For a limited period of time only we are offering discount of £10 per month for the first three months*. That means for just £25 per month (80p per day) you can get your services seen by 1000′s of equestrian professionals.

*Minimum term is three months

Get going in three easy steps...

1. Choose your sign in details by clicking here

2. Complete your profile

3. Pay to go live and get new customers

Horse Scout invests in star show jumpers

Horse Scout invests in star show jumpers

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Horse Scout, which has secured global investment to further develop its innovative equestrian social network platform and help riders boost their professional careers, is to sponsor the next round of young show jumpers on the British Showjumping and Haddon Training Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (AASE) programme in its mission to nurture future Olympic stars.

Applications for the 2016/17 AASE programme open at the end of July and those accepted will have the opportunity to be coached and trained by some of the top sporting coaches and experts in the UK including Heike Holstein (flatwork) and Andrew Saywell (jumping).

The programme also gives participants (age 16-19) access to experts that focus on them as an athlete: a physiotherapist to help reduce imbalances and weaknesses, a dietitian to advise on nutrition, and a media trainer who can help develop communication skills.

Aimed at developing and preparing talented young upcoming athletes at the top of their game, the AASE programme provides training and education for those who have a real chance of excelling in their sport and competing at European and Olympic level.

The AASE programme also develops the riders into young professionals within the sport with many progressing to start and run their own businesses.

Haddon Training has delivered AASE for British Showjumping since 2013 with 100 young riders completing the 12-15-month programme which culminates in a Level 3 nationally recognised qualification — equivalent to two A-Levels and 85 UCAS points.

Corinne Bracken, AASE Programme Manager, says: “The programme covers all the core components including technical, tactical, mental and physical skills delivered by industry experts, plus those that are essential to attracting owners and sponsors to the sport. It’s great that global organisations such as Horse Scout recognise the importance of supporting future stars.”

How to apply:Any young rider seeking details on the AASE application process should contact staci.cox@haddontraining.co.uk

 

Want to Shine in the Showring? – What are the judges looking for?

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There is so much to know about the show ring.  Take a look at the long list of seventeen Top Tips which give a clue for every important conformation requirement for a well made horse to shine in a Ridden Horse Show.

Not only must your show horse be immaculately turned out, as must you, he should be impeccably schooled and ready for anyone to ride. Before venturing into the show ring make sure you understand what is required of you and of your horse.

Learn ring craft form the best , go on a course, attend clinics or even livery your horse at a showing yard.  That way you can take the show season on knowing you have prepared everything as well as you possibly can.

Horse Scout has Justine Armstrong Small listed on its professional rider pages.  She runs a yard training people and horses for the showroom and also hosts clinics specifically aimed at those who want to perfect their ringcraft.

  1. If you want to take part in riding Horse Classes not only is the ride itself important but, ultimately, it will come down to type and conformation. If you are buying a show horse you need to look for a horse which should be of Thoroughbred type, (really more of a National Hunt type) with
  2. plenty of good quality, flat bone,
  3. deep through the girth and
  4. with strong powerful second thighs and a
  5. well rounded backside, lots of muscle and strength,
  6. short across the loins and with the length of back concentrated on the quarters, so that you have a powerful engine.
  7. They need to be able to gallop.
  8. A very sloping shoulder is excellent, so there is plenty to sit behind and the horse is able to have a long stride,
  9. with a neck coming out of the top of the withers and a good length, narrowing elegantly behind the head so that the head and neck are not restricted by a fat thick structure.
  10. To make an impression in the ring the horse needs to be able
  11. to flex and bridle happily and comfortably, and
  12. be able to breathe easily while being ridden in collection.
  13. The body should be in proportion and foursquare,
  14. the legs, especially viewed from the front should not appear too close, or too wide.
  15. The horse should move straight, without dishing or plaiting and stand straight on all four legs on good well shaped feet.
  16. A good looking head is very desirable, but there is quite a lot of variation; from a dished slightly Araby head, to a longer straighter, more thoroughbred head, what is not wanted is a tiny pony head or anything with a common cobby aspect, roman nose or bumps between the eyes!
  17. Good big second thighs are essential and if the tail is lifted there should not be a wide space of nothing under it (split up behind) – there should be plenty of muscle. Mares do tend to be longer in the back than geldings because they have to carry foals