Tag Archives: show

Top Professionals and Top Showjumping Tips on Hose Scout

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Encouraging your horse to use his shoulder effectively when jumping.

Working with a professional Show Jumper in a training session to improve your horses jumping mechanics could easily involve particular techniques to encourage a better use of the shoulder, says Horse Scout Blogger.  These techniques teach your horse to produce a better bascule, and therefore, a softer landing. One such exercise is using an A frame with a ground pole to mark the final stride into the jump.

The A Frame

Once you have warmed up and started jumping introduce two poles leaning against the top rail of a simple upright fence.  Keep the distance between these wide to start with the ends that are on the ground forming the open end of a triangle shape.  (like a perspective line on a drawing….leading the horse in towards the jumping pole).

Approach steadily but with energy and allow your horse to see his stride to the ground pole.

Once the horse is used to the idea of the leading triangle you can begin to reduce the width of the top point.

Make sure your horse remains calm on approach.

Don’t rush things

You can take a few sessions before you get to the point that the top poles are almost touching.

Once they are in this position you will notice how the horse is able to engage his shoulders and for arms more flexibly and the bascule starts to become more rounded along with a greater lift to the shoulder area.

Are you looking for a show jumping coach then take a look at the Horse Scout Professional Listings.

Here are just some of the professionals we have listed:

William Whitaker: An International Showjumper based in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. I have represented Great Britain on numerous occassions, including junior and young rider Europeans and senior nations cups. I currently have a team of horses ranging from youngsters to grand prix level. Best results include winning World Cup Qualifiers in Mechelen and more recently in Stuttgart. I also recently won the CSI 3* Grand Prix at the Glock Horse Performance Centre in Austria aboard Fandango.

Laura Jackson also based in Warwickshire and Remey Ellis from Hampshire a 22 year old Grand Prix Show Jumper based in Hampshire at the beautiful Blackwater Equestrian. She is available for teaching, schooling/competing, and competition/sales livery. A Professional Rider  whose up coming competitions schedule includes The Blue Chip Winter Championships Welsh Masters Bury Farm Spring Classic Chepstow International CSI 2* Royal Windsor Horse Show Bury Farm Summer Classic Arena UK International CSI 2* South of England Show Bolesworth International CSI 2* Hickstead Derby Meeting International CSI 4* South View British Masters International CSI 3*

Solid reputations and satisfied customers: Talk about Trainers and Traders

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Solid reputations and satisfied customers: Talk about Trainers and Traders

Professional trader Malcolm Aitken (MA Sports Horses) is a regular competitor at Crofton Manor, Sparsholt College & other local venues British Novice to Foxhunter on a range of horses and runs a small competition yard in Medstead where he trains Show Jumping horses from first shows to Foxhunter level.  Malcolm currently has a very exciting string of horses and is looking forward to attracting new horses and owners. We also try to fit in some away shows and have in the past stayed away at The Hand and Wales & West and am hoping to have some horses for the Addington Young Horse classes later this year and is looking for owners who are keen to support a very consistent professional reach the next level.

MA Sports horses also has an exciting opportunity for an apprentice show jumping groom / working pupil who is hard working, literate and honest an young person to train as a show jumping groom. The applicant must be organised, dedicated, punctual, good with animals and patient. The successful applicant will be provided with suitable training and instruction to allow him/her to progress their career. It would be beneficial for the applicant to be a capable rider and be prepared to ride a range of horses although not essential. There will be some mucking out some travelling to shows & since we also have a Stallion and several youngsters some of the work will involve providing assistance with our small scale breeding programme. Regrettably no accommodation. Car driver preferred.

Malcom has a string of happy customers all happy to support him and his reputation.


“Warrior has settled in in his new home very well – everybody at Wellington Riding adores him – When I am not there he is only ridden by Instructor level staff and even they fight over who gets him. Warrior has recently made an appearance in the September 2014 ediition of Horse and Rider Magazine, even the head instructor had to be photographed with him. I am very proud. Chrysoula Zervoudakis

 

I would like to thank you so much for everything. I am so proud to say I am the new owner of Cookie. He is going to have a lovely time with me and he is already starting to settle in. Morgan Saunders

 

Thank you for all the work you did breaking TC he is doing brilliantly. Natalie Morat

 

Just thought I would let you know that Freddie has settled in really well. After a few minor bridle adjustments we hacked out on our own and he scored 10 out of 10. Several different routes no problem. Thank you for helping us get together. Jean Baylis

 

I was stunned to win a red rosette in the very first class that Ludo and I entered. I must thank you again for producing such a mannerly and well schooled horse, he is a joy to have on the yard and to take out and I have the added bonus of receiving a constant stream of complimentary remarks. Margaret Dufall”

 

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

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Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

The advantages of buying form a professional Trader is that their reputation rides with you. Top Tips for making right decisions when buying a horse.

Many of Horse Scouts Professional Trainers and riders also sell horses. Generally they buy in or breed horses which they train and compete before selling on. Sometimes they do the same with horses owned by sponsors or clients. This is true across all disciplines, Eventing, Showjumping, Dressage, Showing and Endurance etc. This is part of their business.   Their skill is in being able to make the most of a horse, to optimise its potential at whatever level. You can be sure that a young horse will have had the best start to its training, a horse with competitive potential will have been carefully progressed and given the right opportunities and in the case of rehabilitation or retraining a horse will be back on track and ready to go on to lead a happy useful life.

When horses do well in their competitive arena (or, if they are new to the discipline or young, they will be gaining experience at grass roots level) with a top trainer on board, their successes are a reflection of the trainers skill and reputation. Horses which are bought to the market fit for purpose help a professional trader build a reputation and repeat custom. It is not in the interest of a professional rider to produce horses which are going to fail to support their business by being suitable for purpose.   Professional riders have the skill and experience to ride all sorts of different horses and know how to ensure that each horse is given a prgramme which is right for them.

However as a buyer you also have responsibilities to ensure that a Professional Trader can help you make the right choice when buying a horse.

When you look through the Horses for Sale listings on a site like Horse Scout you certainly have a lot of good horses to choose from.

However, it is fair to say that buyers have an obligation to honestly represent their skill level, the accommodations they can offer a horse, and their intentions to the seller they are contacting.

There are certainly an infinite number of tales that illustrate less than ideal partnerships but to be fair to the sellers it can come down to the failure of the buyers to asses their own situation or communicate honestly with the seller. Remember that no horse is ever “finished.” They are sensitive creatures that continue to learn new behaviors throughout their lives. A novice horse person can inadvertently “undo” professional training faster than a terrier will snatch and swallow the family hamster. Here are some thoughts about buyers responsibilities.

  1. If you make an appointment to go look at a horse, don’t leave the seller hanging by not turning up. If you can’t make it for some reason, or will be later than scheduled, call your seller. It’s the polite thing to do, after all.
  2. If the horse’s price is more than you want to spend, ask the seller whether it’s negotiable before you make an appointment. If the seller says no, you won’t be wasting your time or his.
  3. Bring your hard hat, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear for riding. Do not assume to wear spur of to carry a whip.
  4. You can ask if it’s okay to bring your own saddle. A seller would need to be sure your saddle is in good repair (intact tree, leather not weak or rotten, etc), and that it fits the horse you are trying. This provides two advantages. You’ll be using tack that’s familiar, and you’ll know whether your saddle fits the horse you’re considering.
  5. Turn your cell phone off while you are trying a horse. It’s rude to take the seller’s time with personal calls and a suddenly ringing phone may frighten the horse.
  6. Do not bring your dog. Many farms have their own dogs, and the sellers won’t appreciate the disruption of yours running around. Also, your dog may chase or injure the seller’s horses, or other animals.
  7. If you have small children and plan to include them, bring along someone to mind the kids while you concentrate on the horse. Unattended children with horses can be extremely dangerous.
  8. Be honest about your abilities and level of riding. If you have an ethical seller, he will want to sell you a suitable horse. If your seller is an experienced horse person, he’ll know pretty quickly how adept you are by watching you with his horse, so don’t fudge; it’s not worth it.
  9. A horse is an individual and frequently develops a relationship with the person who rides it most often. If your seller rides the horse first and the horse seems very well trained, don’t be disappointed if the horse doesn’t perform quite as well when you get on. Even subtle differences in riding technique can produce very different responses from the horse. It may just be a matter of time and a little professional help before you and your new horse become a team.
  10. Don’t be surprised if the seller wants you to begin in a small area, like a paddock or round pen. He may want to assess your skills, for your own safety and for that of the horse. However, be wary of a seller who doesn’t offer a larger area (a ring, arena or pasture) once he’s comfortable with your abilities. Dishonest sellers know that a horse may be fine in a round pen but will bolt for the hills in a open pasture.
  11. Ask the seller about the horse’s daily routine and feeding schedule. A horse that is turned out every day and is eating grass or a little hay could turn into an entirely different horse if you buy it, keep it in a stall and feed it grain. Ask your seller about the level of activity the horse is accustomed to; is it ridden every day, every week, once a month? If you buy a horse that has been worked regularly, but you plan to ride once a month, your horse may not be as easy to handle after a month of leisure. Conversely, if the horse goes from being ridden once a month to your enthusiastic regime of five days a week, the horse may become sore (as you probably will). You’ll go home and relax in your hot tub. Your new horse might buck, rear, kick, toss its head, or refuse to move because that’s the only way it has to indicate pain.
  12. Take note of the bridle and bit used by your seller. Consider buying something similar if the horse works well and seems relaxed.
  13. If you are shopping for a horse for your child, its looks, cosmetic blemishes and color should be the least important factors in choosing. Look for an older horse, and plan to spend more.

Your seller might ask you:

Details of your experience with horses

What sort of support you’ll have; for example, a trainer, a very experienced friend, riding lessons, etc

Katie Jerram

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We welcome one of the top showing producers to Horse Scout. Katie has a rider, trainer, and yard profile with us.

With in excess of 35 years experience riding and producing… Katie continues to produce horses for the Queen, and manages to maintain a role as a columnist for Horse and Hound for approaching 14 years  now!

To view Katie Jerram Showing yard click here