Tag Archives: jumping

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BEHIND THE SCENES: GRIT, GLAMOUR AND GREAT SPORT AT THE LONGINES FEI NATIONS CUP FINAL BARCELONA 2018

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I was lucky enough to be reporting at the Longines FEI Nations Cup Final In Barcelona last week. Not only was there great sporting action, a masterful display of horsemanship and a tantalising finish. Beyond this, there were some high profile individuals and interesting back-stories that really highlighted what a special sport this is.

 

Having breakfast in the hotel one morning I was sat next to Jessica Springsteen. The drop-dead gorgeous daughter of Bruce was looking very much in love with boyfriend, Italian heartthrob Lorenzo de Luca, as she ate her boiled egg.  Lorenzo was later caught buying his girl a present in the shopping village.

 

Across the room was World No 1, Harrie with the rest of the Dutch team and World No 2 Mclain Ward, fresh from winning team gold at WEG. Mclain was over to train 19-year-old showjumping sensation; Lucy Deslauriers who was making her first big team appearance for the USA. Extraordinarily Lucy’s father Mario was also competing but for his homeland of Canada. Now 53 years of age, Mario was the youngest ever winner of a World Cup Final at the age of 19 and he and his daughter could make headlines if they both achieve their dreams of being selected for the Tokyo Olympics, for their respective Nations.

 

Also competing at the show were the UAE team who are rising stars. After a fascinating interview, I discovered every one of them has a full-time job and compete just a handful of horses alongside this. Jobs included a policeman, an office administrator and a camel trainer.  “Football is the only professional sport but we are trying to change that” I was told.

 

“Never give up” was the take away message from this year’s prestigious competition. Held in the popular Real Club de Polo in Barcelona for the sixth year in a row, it was the Belgians who won the oldest jumping competition in the world and lifted the Nations Cup trophy. But it was by no means decisive and Peter Weinberg, Chef d’Equipe of the team summed up the result and in that, the very nature of equestrian sport. “We call ourselves the “Never Give Up Team” because in the middle we had two with 12 faults already but still we were fighting to the last rider, so this victory means a lot to us!”

 

With one of the most challenging tracks this final has seen, of the eight nations who went through to the final, just three riders jumped clear. It is hardly surprising that Course Designer Santiago Varela has been selected as course designer for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The track was imposing and technical and questioned control, balance, judgement and skill, all the way around. As Varela pointed out it wasn’t about the number of faults the riders collected. “A score of 8 or 12 didn’t mean they had a bad round, horses jumped unbelievably, but the course was difficult, tough and big…and everything was connected”, he explained.

 

As was the case with most of the teams, the Belgians had mixed fortunes, Niels Bruynseels gave the team confidence with a superb clear from Gancia de Muze but both Pieter Devos (Claire Z) and Jos Verlooy (Caracas) each leaving three fences on the floor. However, it was the dashing Nicola Philippaerts, who saved the day with a sublime clear round on H&M Harley v. Bisschop and that sealed the deal.

 

Nicola said his teammates told him “everything is still possible” when he was last to go. “I just tried to ride my own class and it worked out well – today it was me that could make the clear round that would make a difference, and another time it will be one of the others”. And he had even more reason to be pleased when sharing the €100,000 bonus for double-clear performances with team-mate Bruynseels, Sweden’s Peder Fredricson and Italy’s new star, Riccardo Pisani.

 

This was Belgium’s second win of the Longines FEI Nations Cup in Barcelona; their last came in 2015. As Chef d’Equipe Weinberg said: “it was an interesting day, first ups and then in between downs, but in the end, we won anyway so it was really great sport!”

 

 

 

 

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Tina Cook

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Tina Cook

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Tina Cook is one of Britain’s most successful event riders and has been a mainstay on Team GB since the early 1990’s. She is a three-time Olympic medallist, winning individual and team bronze in 2008 and team silver in London 2012 as well as winning a further 11 medals at World and European Championships. She was part of the gold medal winning team at last year’s European Championships with Billy the Red.

Surprisingly, Tina reveals that some of her best horses have seemed “fairly average” as young horses. The good news is for us budding event riders is that Tina believes that you do not need to start with a massive budget to find a suitable event horse, even if have big ambitions. “In my experience it’s all about having a horse with a good brain” she says. “Then by creating a trusting partnership and having good management as I have done with all my top horses, look at where it can get you.”

When I look back on my top horses they have not necessarily been the most outstanding young horses, but what they have all had in common is that they have had a trainable, competitive brain and an attitude to want to please me.”

Buying British and buying blood.

Tina has never felt the need to look abroad and has bought the majority of her horses in the UK. Many have come from bloodstock sales or via her brother, the well -known racehorse trainer Nick Gifford.  “I rarely go out and look to buy horses, they tend to find me, but when I do, I have always leaned towards Thoroughbreds. As I am looking for championship and potential four star horses, the more thoroughbred blood the better, and certainly nothing less than 60% blood. It is also the brain I am used to working with so it suits me best.

The blood horses may be more average in their movement but they tend to stay sounder due to their movement being more economical and effortless. I look for an easy action when they are cantering and they must be able to travel between fences. When a horse finds galloping and stamina easy, it’s not only one less thing you have to teach them and work on, but they are the ones that find the extra gear to get themselves out of trouble, even when they are tired. It is when horses are tired that injuries happen.”

Less is more

“We are lucky in eventing because in many cases, it’s Mr Average who can make it to the top, in a way that probably isn’t possible in dressage or show-jumping where scope and movement is vital.

There have been many times in my 30 year career, when I have had flashy moving horses with huge scope and I’ve thought it was my next Olympic horse but then they have never stayed sound or proved too be difficult to produce for eventing.

I see this a lot with Junior riders. They have a taste of championship level and with some money behind them, they think they need something that looks flashy and throws a big jump. But these horses are more difficult to ride because they are bigger and rangier and use more effort.

Through my career, I haven’t had big money to spend and it’s been a case of making the best of what I’ve got. Smithstown Lad was a 16 hand hunter hireling from Ireland. Together we were on the Junior and Young Rider teams, he took me to my first Badminton and finished 4th at Burghley.

Even Miners Frolic as a young horse had a very “Thoroughbred” technique over a fence and he was naturally the bravest, but he had a lovely attitude. So we had to work on trust and technique. Then Star Witness was a racing reject and I never thought he would make a four-star horse. But he has always tried his heart out. He has now done four, four-stars with a top ten placing in every one.”

I have produced almost all of mine from scratch. Until I got to my 40s and some owners wanted to buy something to go to the Olympics so we found Billy the Red through an agent. This was the first time I have ever done this and was the first I have ridden with eventing form, as he had done a few Intermediates.

“It is definitely important and I am a big believer in “no foot, no horse”. I have had horses with bad feet and they can stay sound if managed very carefully. When buying, I wouldn’t necessarily dismiss poor conformation or weakness if I liked everything else. A lot of my horses have had issues and I have found a way to keep them on track through the levels. It’s partly because I have not had lots to spend but also because I am stubborn. If a horse has some talent and a good attitude and I see them improving, that really excites me and I want to keep going, even if they do face physical challenges.”

Producing the Prize

Tina notes that however talented a horse, there is no substitution for good horsemanship. “Yes, everybody has upped their game, but I believe success comes more from the right training and good management more than relying on exceptionally talented horses. Look at Michael Jung. He turned both Sam and Fischer Rocana from glorified Young Rider horses into four-star winners.

I am very strict with making sure they are really established at one level before I move up to the next, even if that means spending more than a season before you step up. They don’t always have to be jumping big fences and going flat out to get the time in every event. Very few horses can cope with that both mentally and physically on every occasion. So I save that for when it really matters.

The most important thing is that horses enjoy it. It never works to bully a horse into doing something, they will eventually become unstuck because they won’t trust their rider. They have to want to please me rather than be frightened.”

 

Kit that powers Tina’s success

We always want to know what the latest “tack trends” plus the brands favoured by professionals. So here are Tina’s top choices:

“All my horses have been fed on Red Mills feed for years now and my brother Nick has all his racehorses on it too.

I ride in Voltaire saddles and virtually live in my Ariat boots and Gatehouse hat. For the horses I use Prolite boots for every day and competition, and as my horses spend a lot of time in the field we have plenty of rugs from Jumpers Horseline.”

 

Written by Ellie Kelly

Funnell Vision,

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Press by Ellie Kelly Media, Horse Scout Team

The London International Horse Show at Olympia has been happy hunting ground for our ambassador William Funnell, for a number of decades. This year William brings two “Billy” horses Billy McCain and Billy Angelo to the line-up. Both horses have been bred by the world famous Billy Stud, a joint venture between William and Donal Barnwell.

Billy McCain is a flashy grey nine year old gelding owned by Denise Stamp and has been causing a stir on the international circuit. He is by Cevin Z, a former Grand Prix jumper who William competed. The dam sire is an Irish Sport horse by Cruising out of a Sky Boy Mare. This season he has stepped up to CSI 5* competitions, including competing in the FEI World Cup in Oslo in October.

Billy Angelo is an old timer on the showjumping. The 14 year old chestnut gelding is by Tangelo Van De Zuuthoeve out of a Kroongraaf mare has been competing in the Global Champions Tour as well as having 10 FEI wins under his belt.

Horse Scout has supported both William and the Billy Stud in a number of ways in 2017. We have been promoting the Billy Stud bloodlines via our Global Equestrian Platform including providing media coverage of the Billy Stud auction.

Our employment services provided the Funnell team with a key work rider Jay Hijazi who has been with them over 12 months. Jay told us: “Working at the Billy Stud has been an amazing experience. Just incredible”.

Through our product placement, we also secured JinStirrup Dynamik irons for William Funnell. A cutting edge stirrup with a new product line appearing in 2018.

 

Top Professionals and Top Showjumping Tips on Hose Scout

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Encouraging your horse to use his shoulder effectively when jumping.

Working with a professional Show Jumper in a training session to improve your horses jumping mechanics could easily involve particular techniques to encourage a better use of the shoulder, says Horse Scout Blogger.  These techniques teach your horse to produce a better bascule, and therefore, a softer landing. One such exercise is using an A frame with a ground pole to mark the final stride into the jump.

The A Frame

Once you have warmed up and started jumping introduce two poles leaning against the top rail of a simple upright fence.  Keep the distance between these wide to start with the ends that are on the ground forming the open end of a triangle shape.  (like a perspective line on a drawing….leading the horse in towards the jumping pole).

Approach steadily but with energy and allow your horse to see his stride to the ground pole.

Once the horse is used to the idea of the leading triangle you can begin to reduce the width of the top point.

Make sure your horse remains calm on approach.

Don’t rush things

You can take a few sessions before you get to the point that the top poles are almost touching.

Once they are in this position you will notice how the horse is able to engage his shoulders and for arms more flexibly and the bascule starts to become more rounded along with a greater lift to the shoulder area.

Are you looking for a show jumping coach then take a look at the Horse Scout Professional Listings.

Here are just some of the professionals we have listed:

William Whitaker: An International Showjumper based in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. I have represented Great Britain on numerous occassions, including junior and young rider Europeans and senior nations cups. I currently have a team of horses ranging from youngsters to grand prix level. Best results include winning World Cup Qualifiers in Mechelen and more recently in Stuttgart. I also recently won the CSI 3* Grand Prix at the Glock Horse Performance Centre in Austria aboard Fandango.

Laura Jackson also based in Warwickshire and Remey Ellis from Hampshire a 22 year old Grand Prix Show Jumper based in Hampshire at the beautiful Blackwater Equestrian. She is available for teaching, schooling/competing, and competition/sales livery. A Professional Rider  whose up coming competitions schedule includes The Blue Chip Winter Championships Welsh Masters Bury Farm Spring Classic Chepstow International CSI 2* Royal Windsor Horse Show Bury Farm Summer Classic Arena UK International CSI 2* South of England Show Bolesworth International CSI 2* Hickstead Derby Meeting International CSI 4* South View British Masters International CSI 3*

Solid reputations and satisfied customers: Talk about Trainers and Traders

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Solid reputations and satisfied customers: Talk about Trainers and Traders

Professional trader Malcolm Aitken (MA Sports Horses) is a regular competitor at Crofton Manor, Sparsholt College & other local venues British Novice to Foxhunter on a range of horses and runs a small competition yard in Medstead where he trains Show Jumping horses from first shows to Foxhunter level.  Malcolm currently has a very exciting string of horses and is looking forward to attracting new horses and owners. We also try to fit in some away shows and have in the past stayed away at The Hand and Wales & West and am hoping to have some horses for the Addington Young Horse classes later this year and is looking for owners who are keen to support a very consistent professional reach the next level.

MA Sports horses also has an exciting opportunity for an apprentice show jumping groom / working pupil who is hard working, literate and honest an young person to train as a show jumping groom. The applicant must be organised, dedicated, punctual, good with animals and patient. The successful applicant will be provided with suitable training and instruction to allow him/her to progress their career. It would be beneficial for the applicant to be a capable rider and be prepared to ride a range of horses although not essential. There will be some mucking out some travelling to shows & since we also have a Stallion and several youngsters some of the work will involve providing assistance with our small scale breeding programme. Regrettably no accommodation. Car driver preferred.

Malcom has a string of happy customers all happy to support him and his reputation.


“Warrior has settled in in his new home very well – everybody at Wellington Riding adores him – When I am not there he is only ridden by Instructor level staff and even they fight over who gets him. Warrior has recently made an appearance in the September 2014 ediition of Horse and Rider Magazine, even the head instructor had to be photographed with him. I am very proud. Chrysoula Zervoudakis

 

I would like to thank you so much for everything. I am so proud to say I am the new owner of Cookie. He is going to have a lovely time with me and he is already starting to settle in. Morgan Saunders

 

Thank you for all the work you did breaking TC he is doing brilliantly. Natalie Morat

 

Just thought I would let you know that Freddie has settled in really well. After a few minor bridle adjustments we hacked out on our own and he scored 10 out of 10. Several different routes no problem. Thank you for helping us get together. Jean Baylis

 

I was stunned to win a red rosette in the very first class that Ludo and I entered. I must thank you again for producing such a mannerly and well schooled horse, he is a joy to have on the yard and to take out and I have the added bonus of receiving a constant stream of complimentary remarks. Margaret Dufall”

 

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

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Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

The advantages of buying form a professional Trader is that their reputation rides with you. Top Tips for making right decisions when buying a horse.

Many of Horse Scouts Professional Trainers and riders also sell horses. Generally they buy in or breed horses which they train and compete before selling on. Sometimes they do the same with horses owned by sponsors or clients. This is true across all disciplines, Eventing, Showjumping, Dressage, Showing and Endurance etc. This is part of their business.   Their skill is in being able to make the most of a horse, to optimise its potential at whatever level. You can be sure that a young horse will have had the best start to its training, a horse with competitive potential will have been carefully progressed and given the right opportunities and in the case of rehabilitation or retraining a horse will be back on track and ready to go on to lead a happy useful life.

When horses do well in their competitive arena (or, if they are new to the discipline or young, they will be gaining experience at grass roots level) with a top trainer on board, their successes are a reflection of the trainers skill and reputation. Horses which are bought to the market fit for purpose help a professional trader build a reputation and repeat custom. It is not in the interest of a professional rider to produce horses which are going to fail to support their business by being suitable for purpose.   Professional riders have the skill and experience to ride all sorts of different horses and know how to ensure that each horse is given a prgramme which is right for them.

However as a buyer you also have responsibilities to ensure that a Professional Trader can help you make the right choice when buying a horse.

When you look through the Horses for Sale listings on a site like Horse Scout you certainly have a lot of good horses to choose from.

However, it is fair to say that buyers have an obligation to honestly represent their skill level, the accommodations they can offer a horse, and their intentions to the seller they are contacting.

There are certainly an infinite number of tales that illustrate less than ideal partnerships but to be fair to the sellers it can come down to the failure of the buyers to asses their own situation or communicate honestly with the seller. Remember that no horse is ever “finished.” They are sensitive creatures that continue to learn new behaviors throughout their lives. A novice horse person can inadvertently “undo” professional training faster than a terrier will snatch and swallow the family hamster. Here are some thoughts about buyers responsibilities.

  1. If you make an appointment to go look at a horse, don’t leave the seller hanging by not turning up. If you can’t make it for some reason, or will be later than scheduled, call your seller. It’s the polite thing to do, after all.
  2. If the horse’s price is more than you want to spend, ask the seller whether it’s negotiable before you make an appointment. If the seller says no, you won’t be wasting your time or his.
  3. Bring your hard hat, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear for riding. Do not assume to wear spur of to carry a whip.
  4. You can ask if it’s okay to bring your own saddle. A seller would need to be sure your saddle is in good repair (intact tree, leather not weak or rotten, etc), and that it fits the horse you are trying. This provides two advantages. You’ll be using tack that’s familiar, and you’ll know whether your saddle fits the horse you’re considering.
  5. Turn your cell phone off while you are trying a horse. It’s rude to take the seller’s time with personal calls and a suddenly ringing phone may frighten the horse.
  6. Do not bring your dog. Many farms have their own dogs, and the sellers won’t appreciate the disruption of yours running around. Also, your dog may chase or injure the seller’s horses, or other animals.
  7. If you have small children and plan to include them, bring along someone to mind the kids while you concentrate on the horse. Unattended children with horses can be extremely dangerous.
  8. Be honest about your abilities and level of riding. If you have an ethical seller, he will want to sell you a suitable horse. If your seller is an experienced horse person, he’ll know pretty quickly how adept you are by watching you with his horse, so don’t fudge; it’s not worth it.
  9. A horse is an individual and frequently develops a relationship with the person who rides it most often. If your seller rides the horse first and the horse seems very well trained, don’t be disappointed if the horse doesn’t perform quite as well when you get on. Even subtle differences in riding technique can produce very different responses from the horse. It may just be a matter of time and a little professional help before you and your new horse become a team.
  10. Don’t be surprised if the seller wants you to begin in a small area, like a paddock or round pen. He may want to assess your skills, for your own safety and for that of the horse. However, be wary of a seller who doesn’t offer a larger area (a ring, arena or pasture) once he’s comfortable with your abilities. Dishonest sellers know that a horse may be fine in a round pen but will bolt for the hills in a open pasture.
  11. Ask the seller about the horse’s daily routine and feeding schedule. A horse that is turned out every day and is eating grass or a little hay could turn into an entirely different horse if you buy it, keep it in a stall and feed it grain. Ask your seller about the level of activity the horse is accustomed to; is it ridden every day, every week, once a month? If you buy a horse that has been worked regularly, but you plan to ride once a month, your horse may not be as easy to handle after a month of leisure. Conversely, if the horse goes from being ridden once a month to your enthusiastic regime of five days a week, the horse may become sore (as you probably will). You’ll go home and relax in your hot tub. Your new horse might buck, rear, kick, toss its head, or refuse to move because that’s the only way it has to indicate pain.
  12. Take note of the bridle and bit used by your seller. Consider buying something similar if the horse works well and seems relaxed.
  13. If you are shopping for a horse for your child, its looks, cosmetic blemishes and color should be the least important factors in choosing. Look for an older horse, and plan to spend more.

Your seller might ask you:

Details of your experience with horses

What sort of support you’ll have; for example, a trainer, a very experienced friend, riding lessons, etc

Making the right shapes in the show jumping arena – 8 different approaches to perfecting your horses jumping.

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Horse Scout Blogger has been contemplating show jumps this weekend.  Each type of jumps asks for a subtly different approach and energy.  In order to feel confident in the arena it’s a good idea to understand what question each style is asking of your horse and also its important to teach your horse how to jump the different fences to improve your show jumping.

1.  Ground poles

Really boost your horse’s bascule by using ground poles to create a wider fence base – he’ll instinctively know what to do. Without a ground line a fence becomes more advanced, drawing your horse in close, making it harder for him to jump well and get his legs out of the way in time.

You can also make a V-shape with ground poles before fences to channel your horse’s energy on approach, helping produce a much better jump.

2. Cross-poles

A great warm-up and schooling fence, cross-poles help your horse start to open up and use his shoulders. The V-shape encourages him to come centrally to the fence, tuck his knees neatly up and to look at what he’s being asked to jump. The taller the cross-pole, the more it will improve his action, as he works those shoulders and really lifts up.

3. Vertical

A vertical (or upright) is made of poles in the same vertical plane, and encourages your horse to make a taller, rounder shape in his jump. The take-off and landing spots will be the same distance away from the fence, so your horse will make quite a steep shape into it, lifting his shoulders higher vertically and tucking his forelegs up and away quite quickly.

4. Fillers

Fillers are great for getting a round shape in your horse’s jump, and by creating an illusion of solid colour he’ll really look at what he’s facing. They’re great for a bold horse because they demand respect, but if he’s lacking in confidence, fillers can make a fence harder to ride.

5. Planks

Planks work the same way as a vertical, creating a tall, steep jump shape, but they’re easier to knock down as they sit on flat cups. Planks create a more solid-looking fence, so your horse may back off a bit, and even produce a bigger jump, and as they tend not to have a ground line, they’ll draw him in quite deep, so he needs a more powerful jump to clear them!

6. Triple bar

Made with three poles of ascending height, triple bars create a longer, more open jump. Your horse really has to stretch and lift his front end to clear them, and they can be challenging when linked with other fences. Because their width requires more power, your horse will come deeper into the fence before take-off and land further out than normal, so if you’re working out your strides to the next fence keep this in mind.

7. Oxer

Two parallel vertical fences form an oxer, creating a spread that gets horses up in the air, producing a rounder, more equal shape than a triple bar encourages with take-off and landing spots the same distance from the fence. Because of the power your horse uses to push himself up and over, he may run on a little on landing, or lack energy because he used it up in the air.

8. Liverpool Oxer

A Liverpool is a vertical or oxer with a ditch or large tray of water underneath. The tray makes your horse look at the fence (which can cause his head and neck to drop as he approaches) then encourages him to get up in the air, creating a large, round jump.place the tray in front of the fence and it mimics the effect of a triple bar, encouraging a wider, more open jump which rises gradually. Place the tray under the fence or out behind it and your horse will draw deep into the fence, producing a more upright take-off and more reach as he lands. If you don’t have a water tray, you can create the same effect by laying something on the ground beneath a fence such as a rug.

This great advice comes from show jumper Mia Korenika who explains how different fences and elements can help your horse become a more athletic, careful jumper.  Use this link to check out her facebook page.

 

Keep those Show Jumps Standing- 7 steps to jump a perfect round.

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To jump a horse successfully a rider can break each stage in the process down into seven separate steps. the seven stages need to be ridden accurately. With the rider remaining in balance and able to help the horse both before during and after the jump.

The 7 stages to jumping:

1. Turn.

2. Approach.

3. Take off.

4. Jump.

5. Landing.

6. Get away.

7. Turn.

1) The Turn

The turn to the jump needs to be ridden accurately so that it lines you up with the centre of the jump being straight ahead. The rider needs to be sitting up and looking ahead to the jump that they are going to do, with the horse being ridden from the riders leg up into the hand, to keep the horse in a balanced rhythm which has plenty of impulsion.

2) Approach

The approach needs to lead you directly to the centre of the jump which you are planning to jump. The rider needs to be sitting up, looking ahead and channeling the horse forward, between their hand and their legs enabling the rider to maintain a straight line, with the horse maintaining the impulsion and balance that is required.

3) Take Off

This is the point at which the horse begins to gather his hindlegs underneath his body and starts to lift up the forehand. The rider needs to keep their lower leg securely wrapped around, to maintain the horses energy and forward momentum.The riders hands need to follow the movement of the horses head and neck and still maintain a contact through the rein to the bit. At the point of takeoff the rider should still be looking ahead, up and over the jump.

4) Jump

This is the point at which the horse will bascule in the air,the forehand is well lifted, and the back well rounded, with their forelegs tucked up in the front and the hind legs tucked up at the back allowing the horse to clear the jump. When the horse is in the air the the rider folds into the jumping position. To achieve a good fold the riders upper body is lowered, with the seat being slipped to the back of the saddle, the riders hand position allows the horse to stretch through their neck, back and body, giving the horse the freedom of movement they require, while still maintaining a light contact through the rein. The riders lower leg needs to stay securely wrapped around the horse to help maintain balance when in the fold or jumping position. The riders position needs to fold straight so that they can still look ahead through the horses ears and on to the next fence, any deviation of the riders position by going off to the side or twisting of the position will unbalance not only the horse but ultimately the rider as well.

5) Landing

The horse now starts to stretch out and extend their front legs ready for landing. Depending on the cater lead that is required, the horse will land with one foreleg landing first then quickly followed by the other foreleg, and the hindquarters following through from behind. The rider will start by bringing their upper body back up into a upright position, while still allowing their hands to remain in contact through the rein to the bit in the horses mouth, but without interfering with the horses balance and movement, this is especially important as horses use their necks for most of their balance. The riders lower leg should remain in position, still on the girth area of the horse, with the rider looking ahead to the next fence.

6) Get Away

The horse is now moving away from the jump and on to the next. The rider needs to make sure that the horse is in balance with plenty of energy and impulsion still being generated and that the horse is on the correct canter lead to enable it to turn in balance to the next fence. The rider should check that their position is still accurate, with reins the correct length, and lower leg secure and with the upper body sitting tall and the rider focused on the next jump.

7) Turn

This is where the rider turns away from one fence and on to the other, and the seven stages start all over again.

Are you looking for a jumping horse.  Horse Scout has some great horses and ponies advertised on its pages.  Take a look.

Aim for the stars – Like Michael Whitaker

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Are you aiming for the top too? Show Jumping legend Michael Whitaker Takes Double Victory in Hong Kong.

Pony Club Hero John Whitaker’s Double scoop at the Hong Kong Masers last weekend has to be so inspiring for every show jumper but when you have such a long and remarkably successful career you begin to have a fan club base and many of them are in The Pony Club. For so many who take part in grass roots competitions every weekend (rain or shine) its wins like these that make children want to do well.  After all every show jumper started off exactly where they are now, didn’t they?

I have to say that if you make it to the top the rewards are certainly enormous with prize pots standing at $700,000 in the Langines Grand Prix alone.  But its not just about he money for these top riders its about their fantastic horses.  After his winning round in the jump off in 42.54 seconds Whitaker said as he gave the credit to his horse. “I think Argento likes Hong Kong. He is certainly in really good form.” “He jumped three days and he did not touch a fence,” We all dram about owning a horse that is as good as that….one day.

However, we all have to start somewhere and Horse Scout has a couple of great little jumping ponies on its list for the right aspiring show jumper.

Norbet  (brilliant name by the way!) a 14.2 Irish Sports bred pony with over £300 winnings (registered grade 3) is near Blandford Forum, at £26,000 has the potential to be a “big track pony” with the right rider. Norbet will always try his hardest. He will go off any stride. He is very scopey and  loves his job. A Serious contender for Newcomers / Foxhunter 2nd rounds and Winter JC for 2015 with scope to go on to jump JA & EuropeansFantastic opportunity to acquire such a lovely pony as rider moving onto horses Extremely fast against the clock and very careful Winnings of £794 and 383 points Norbet has the heart of a lion – he is brave and bold and totally honestGreat to shoe, clip, load etc…Please note: Norbet can be sharp so 5* professional home needed Will be available after EHPI. So serious enquiries only

Another talented contender might be Robe Duster – whose record speaks for itself Actual winnings are £4050, Points 2336 Qualified HOYS Foxhunter final 2011 and 2012 Qualified HOYS Pony Show Jumper final 2014 2nd in the RIHS Winter JC championship 2012.  He has been in the same home for 41.2 years and they are looking for a competitive 5* home. With a pony this good you can understand that they only want serious enquires only, please no time wasters.

 

 

Are you looking for Choice – Horse Dealer and Breeder Caron Nichol has it all

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Since 2004 Carron Nicol, the International Show jumper, has run European Sports Horses Ltd, a large breeding, show jumping and dealing yard at Rumer Stud Farm, Long Marston Road, Welford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, CV37 8AF.

The stud has a very large selection of horses in excess of 50 available at all times ranging from foals to 12yrs. Horses are either bred by ourselves, (and they have some lovely Show Jumping stallions on our lists)  or imported from the continent. Each horse carries a one month exchange warranty. Feedback for her business in forums has been nothing but positive an being able to trial a horse for a month is a great way to make absolutely sure that you and your horse are a match.

They have 11 horses advertised with Horse Scout. One, Rosie, is a lovely looking 16.2, 5 year old mare grey KWPN by Lord Z jumping at grade C

They stand stallions Crusador,Mr Visto,Fantaland ,Bogarde,Brandon and Cassini Boy.

Rumer Stud Farm

The stud stands on 81 acres and offers excellent grazing for mares at stud.

24hr onsite supervision, Designated lorry parking, Floodlights on school

Horse walker, Individual turn out, Mirrors around school, Onsite communal tea

And they cater for, breaking & producing, breeding & stud, dealing & sales

Equestrian centre (show centres), livery – competition

Company director and international showjumper Carron Nicol has been riding since the age of five and has over 30 years experience running her own business. Carron competes on a regular basis and has won at international level representing Great Britain.Wins also include Horse of The Year Show and placings in The Hickstead Derby and the Hickstead Speed Derby as well as countless wins in International Trials.

Rumer Stud offers excellent trial facilities including a large 80 x 60m outdoor arena with a sand and rubber surface supplied by Mansfield Sand, an indoor school 46m x 20m with a surface supplied by Andrews Bowen and a 7½ furlong all weather gallop.