Tag Archives: buying

Horses for sale are sold correctly with Horse Scout

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

toddy-sell

Making sure your horses for sale are sold correctly with Horse Scout

The majority of us who have ever sold a horse will have experienced tyre kickers, joy riders, greedy agents and trainers with their own agenda. Then there are the international scammers who want to buy the horse from a video without questions- just send all your bank details to that man in Nigeria. It is these individuals who make the selling process an unpleasant experience.

The Legal aspect

Unfortunately when you come to sell a horse, whether you have owned it for a decade or a week you do not have many legal rights and buyers know this. If you are a commercial set up, individual or professional rider who has put expenses for horses through the books, then that makes you a dealer.  It makes no difference if you have owned the horse for years and are selling at a loss.

From a legal point of view, horses are considered as goods. Therefore the jurisdiction relating to the sale of goods applies to them. The law provides people buying from a dealer, significantly more protection than it does as against a private seller.

When someone buys from a seller acting in the course of their business, section 14 of the Sales of Goods Act 1979 will impose terms into the agreement for sale, such as that the horse is of satisfactory quality and fit for the purpose it is being bought for. What this means is that the purchaser has the right to annul the contract and return the horse if it is not in compliance with these terms. For example, if the horse has a behavioural problem that was present prior to the date of purchase, which the buyer only discover after the sale. The buyer is then entitled to a full refund and it is even up to the seller to pick the horse up at their own expense.

However, in the words of an world renowned and highly regarded horse dealer (who shall remain nameless) “you sell the horse not the rider”. Meaning that horses can be ruined very quickly by an unsuitable rider. The good news is that the seller does have some legal rights in this event.

The law regards the purchase of a horse as being the purchase of an unknown quantity. They call it “caveat emptor”, essentially meaning “buyer beware”. So the buyer is responsible for examining the horses thoroughly for suitability and quality before handing over any money. An agreement for the sale of a horse depends both on “express terms”- those specifically agreed between the parties and “implied terms”, which are the conditions implied by the law.

So if you are looking to sell a horse, we have come up with our tips on how to make the process as pain-free as possible. Some may seem obvious but we would hate to say “I told you so”.

  • Honesty is ALWAYS the best policy. If you want to establish and keep a good reputation, it’s never worth deceiving people. We are probably all fools for buying a horse in the first place but not many of us are as ignorant as we may seem, we do our due diligence and insincerity will always come back to haunt you. The horse world is a bitchy place and a hive of gossip and slander- a bad horse is not worth a lifetime of abuse. Remember as a horse seller, many buyers think of you as about as trustworthy as a used car salesman. So surprise them by being totally upfront about a horse’s weaknesses, imperfections and history. It’s a win-win situation and reverse psychology can be an effective tool.
  • Sell quality, correctly produced horses. Quality always sells and usually quickly, meaning less overheads. If you limit yourself to more quality than quantity, you will secure a solid reputation in the industry and have people banging down the door trying to buy your horses. Something ridden with pleasure, is seldom made without effort. You cannot make a Grand Prix dressage horse in two months but train him to stand still when the rider mounts, to load easily and jump around a course without head-butting the rider.

Resist buying it in the first place, solely because it is cheap. Find something desirable that preferably ticks the three boxes- temperament, talent and conformation.

If you do end up with a bad one, consider whether it is worth the effort of trying to make it a good horse. There are other dealers out there who won’t ask the questions and care less about their own reputation.

 

  • Lame horses lose time and money. This goes hand in hand with honesty. If you know it is not 100% on a circle then the vet examining it, certainly will and that just makes you look a fool. There are buyers out there, brave enough to take a punt so if the horse cannot be given time to recover, drop the price and be upfront.

 

  • Market your product. Buyers are unlikely to be convinced to come and look at a horse with blurred iPhone photos and a video filmed from 200 metres away. It can take time to make a horse presentable and make him stand square but it is worth it in the end, whatever the value. So lose the shabby pink headcollar and the muddy legs. Stand him on level ground and throw a few carrots in the air to make him smile for the camera. It’s like internet dating- first impressions do matter!

 

  • The skill of advert descriptions. Make it comprehensive but concise. Imagine you are a journalist or marketeer and try and hook your audience with the opening paragraph. Height, age, sex, purpose and a few buzz words to sum up temperament, looks or ability eg unbelievable scope, wow paces, ultimate schoolmaster. It won’t work on everyone but it helps if you seem positive and excited about the horse you are selling.

 

  • Price appropriately. If you really want to sell, ask a fair price for what the horse is worth today, not what it will be worth in three months’ time after intensive schooling and three wins under it’s belt. When working out price, consider the obvious- the horse’s age, history of soundness, level of training, rideability but also the time of year and your location. It is no myth that the same sound competition horse will command a higher price in affluent part of the country which is easily accessible, than it would if it was based on the North coast of Scotland. Remember everyone likes to feel they are getting a bit of a deal, so be prepared to take something off the asking price. On the other side of the coin (excuse the pun), too cheap will sound alarm bells.

 

  • Realism saves time. Ask the buyer early on, what they are looking for and an honest appraisal of their riding ability. Take a written note of this, it may be useful if you ever get caught in a legal battle over the unsuitability of a horse. Evaluate from their description, their background and their riding as to whether this horse will cope with the partnership. Measure your horse’s height with a real stick rather than relying on what it says in the passport, estimated when it was a yearling.

 

  • Be courteous and prompt Even with suspected time wasters. Respond within 24 hours, even if you cut and paste a ready-made “template”, including video links. Serious buyers will usually pick up the phone first but the downside of living in a digital age is that many people are almost scared of picking up the phone. Keep all prospective buyers in the loop about a horse’s status eg just won a British Novice, still for sale etc. Even if they decide your horse is not for them, be polite and wish them the best of luck in their search. They may end up coming back another time if they enjoyed dealing with you. Or if you know someone selling a horse which may be more suitable, it is always worth sharing. They are more likely to return the favour.

 

Testimonials

“We’ve used Horse Scout for selling horses and I have also been to see horses to buy. There is always a huge selection and you can target exactly what you are looking for.” – Emily King FEI 4* Event Rider. 

“We have advertised multiple horses with Horse Scout and have sold horses quickly and efficiently. We find that responders to the Horse Scout advertisements are genuine and knowledgable horse people which makes advertising with Horse Scout very appealing because you know the horses are going to capable caring homes. The personalised service Hannah and her team provide makes advertising quality horses easy” Alex and Suze Peternell International Event Rider

“I have been using horse scout for the past 8 months. It is a fantastic contribution to the successful running of my business. Easy to use, great service from Hannah. I would recommend to anyone.” Dan Sibley International Event Rider 

 

Written by Ellie Kelly

Photography credits to Libby Law

Top quality Showjumpers for sale on Horse Scout

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Horse Scout  horses for sale classifieds are selling the best horses on the market.

£100,000
Jaffar is an extremely competitive winner at 1.40m and 1.45m level with an incredible list of results including winning every 7yo GP in MET 2 2016. if you like to win then this is the horse for you.
STATS – 16.2hh 8yo gelding, sire Lord Z and damsire Darco.

jaffar

 

POA

Very powerful and careful gelding with a great technique over the jump, competitive in 1.30m classes and placing in 1.40m. Never stops, no vices, with a proper training will progress to Grand Prix. Ranked 18th in the Gold League.

STATS – 17hh 8yo Westphalian gelding, Sire Stedinger, grandsire Sandro Hit

anfisa

 

£35,000
This quality homebred is a fantastic model of a horse with a fabulous technique over his fences. He has a great amount of scope and is a prolific winner in his class. He has won a 6 bar contest, won 1.30m and qualified Blue chip B&C final. Grade A with wins too numerous to mention. A horse for the future with a great amount of talent.
STATS – 16.3hh 8yo Warmblood gelding by Darius

euro

 

£16,000
Fabulous opportunity for ambitious rider looking to gain more experience at the higher levels. Scooby has jumped up to 1.40m level – jumping at the big UK arenas including Hickstead (Derby Stakes) and Royal Windsor and out in Vilamoura Portugal in 2016. Good on the flat with 3 good paces, good flying changes and a great working attitude. Ridden and jumped in a snaffle mouth, This experienced horse really knows his job.
STATS – 16.3hh 11yo bay Selle Francais gelding, sire Iolisco De Quinhon

jnb

 

 Are you looking to sell you horse, or have a horse for sale? Sign up to Horse Scout today or call the team freephone on 03339 398353 for assistance.

Oliver Townend for Horse Scout

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

 

Eleanore Kelly catches up with Horse Scout Ambassador Oliver Townend, about his journey so far, finding good horses, paying the bills and his computer illiteracy.

oli2

Oliver has had another momentous year. The Shropshire-based rider claimed the Number One spot in the British Eventing rankings for the third year running. He finished a staggering 1000 points ahead of any other rider on a total of 2,341 points. There were numerous top ten finishes at International events for Oliver this year, including becoming the first British rider to win Adelaide CIC3* on a horse he had only ridden a few times before competing! The icing on the cake for Oliver was winning the very first Event Rider Masters Series, pocketing £74,000 in the process.

“It was a huge relief to win it” explained Oliver, who has prepared and campaigned several horses with this series in mind. “To me the ERM is a huge step forward in the sport- it’s a concept that works and for the riders and owners the prize money is seriously attractive. It has certainly made a massive difference in terms of my income this year. I didn’t run the horses I knew would be competitive in this class and people expected me to win it from when it was announced. So it was a relief when I did.”

Oliver has always been famed for his grit and determination. Renowned for his ability to get the best out of notoriously difficult horses. In recent years with such success behind him, he has had the luxury of being able to buy and compete better quality horses but he still relishes the challenge of a difficult one. “I love what I do and always have but riding nice horses is the answer to everything for me now. If I am going to event, I want to be on good horses” he says. “It’s difficult to find them and we have to be open minded- new rides come from all angles. I buy quite a lot from Ireland of all ages but I still have room for more owners. I am still sent horses that are talented but perhaps don’t suit other riders and I make the best of those.”

oli

There are a number of stars in the Townend stable. “Too many to list but I really rate Cooley SRS, who is only 9 and finished third at Boekelo” he says. He also cites Cooley Masterclass and King Joules as “exceptionally talented”, the latter has been passed from Mary King and Andrew Nicholson with a reputation for being a tricky ride.

I remember interviewing Oliver for an article some years ago. He was still renting a yard and having to sell anything that was any good and ride all sorts, just to make ends meet. Whilst he may be riding a better string of horses, his attitude to the sport has remained unchanged. What seems to motivate Oliver is an insatiable hunger to win but he still relishes riding talented but often challenging horses. With such success behind him, a string of good horses and a beautiful farm in Shropshire he could be forgiven for resting on his laurels but he has lost none of the grit and determination over the years.

Oliver won Burghley and Badminton back in 2009 and can now add the ERM Series to his list of achievements. Yet two goals remain on the agenda- “I need to get to an Olympics” he says firmly, “and I hope to God that happens soon.”

Then there’s the Rolex Grand Slam, which was won for only the second time by German’s Michael Jung this year. Eventing’s most lucrative prize is awarded to the rider who can achieve the near impossible feat of winning Badminton, Burghley and Lexington consecutively. Oliver was on course in 2010 after winning Badminton and Burghley the previous year. Yet in the cruel nature of the sport, a death-defying fall at Lexington put paid to his chances. It was a fall so dramatic that the photos made the front pages of national newspapers.

“A chance at the Grand Slam and the Olympics are the long-term goals but it all comes down to life in the end.” He says. “For me, this is a business and I need to keep doing what I am doing to survive in the sport. That means I need to sell horses, sometimes good ones.”

As well as selling good horses to keep the wheels turning, Oliver is always on the lookout for new blood and finding the good ones is never easy. “That being said, we are in a really good place in the market right now and if you’ve got a good one it can be worth a fortune” he explains. “There sport is growing in popularity- there are lots of new nations competing and more money coming into, it all helps. I was really encouraged by the prices paid at the recent Go for Gold Sale”, which took place last month in Ireland offered a collection of Irish sport horses selected especially for eventing and ranging from three year olds to established eventers, including Euro Prince who represented Ireland in Rio 2016. Record prices were paid, including €160,000 given for a talented six year old, Cornascriebe Glenpatrick who was bought for Millie Dumas.

Oliver argues that such prices area a real step forward for the industry. “It costs a lot of money to produce horses for eventing, people forget that. Good horses should be making these prices for riders to get a return. It’s also great to see owners paying these prices for their riders, it shows a lot of commitment to the sport, which is what we need to win medals.”

Oliver has been impressed by the service provided by Horse Scout. “It’s an interesting concept for the equestrian community and definitely something our industry needs. Anything to help connect the equestrian industry is a welcome addition. Particularly for professional riders but also breeders and trainers who don’t have time to spend on social media all day. For up and coming young riders, it is a good way of getting their profile out there.”

“The site looks impressive and most importantly, it is easy to use- important for me as I’m computer illiterate! I can ride a difficult horse but I can hardly work out an ipad!” he laughs.

Why You Should Consider Horse Shopping in Ireland

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

 

Contrary to belief, a day out horse shopping in Ireland can be a fun and highly cost-effective way to view a multitude of extremely well bred, potential and proven, Irish competition horses in a short space of time.

Within an hour of Dublin airport, you will find several highly reputable breeders, producers and competition yards with quality stock for sale at sensible prices.  Ireland is renowned for many things but breeding great horses and making Guinness easily come top of the list.

Next time you are looking for your next competition horse, consider a quick day trip to Ireland instead of planning several long drives around England and Scotland to view individual horses. Why not view 6-8 horses in one day to find the horse of your dreams?

Equally, if you’re looking to buy more than one horse, you could plan a weekend trip in order to visit a few big yards. Some breeders and producers will offer overnight hospitality so you’ll leave Ireland having made new friends as well as buying new horses to add to your current string.

If you want to set your pulse racing then you should visit one of the many esteemed sports horse sales in Ireland. The atmosphere was electric at Goresbridge Go For Gold and the Supreme Sale of Showjumpers in November, and I have no doubt the horses they sold will be gracing the top of the leader boards in the very near future.

 

How To Get There

The cheapest and quickest way of getting to Ireland is typically by aeroplane; flights from most regional airports start from just £18! No need to pack a good book as you’ll be landing before you know it; the flight takes approximately one hour. Most Irish breeders help arrange pick up from the airport or will collect you in person.

Ferry is another option and costs range from £50-£180 depending on how far in advance you book and what date you travel on. The ferry isn’t the quickest or cheapest means of getting to Ireland but having your own car does mean you can drive around Ireland at your own leisure and travel further afield to view horses.

Travelling by train is the third option with return tickets from your own local train station starting at approximately £78.

 

Three Quality Irish-Based Horses For Sale on Horse Scout

stafford

1.35m Perfect Young Rider HorseISH Bay Mare rising 8 years 16.1 hands.  Grade A mare with 375 points. She has multiple wins and placings at 1.30m – 1.35m level. She jumped clear in the Hankook 6/7 year old Grand final at Cavan Indoor Championships September 2016. She is a serious speed horse and tries her heart out in the ring. Would be a top horse for a competitive young rider or experienced amateur.

 

kaynolan

Super Rising 7YO CIC* Event HorseBeautiful grey ISH mare 17hh rising 7 years old by Carrick Diamond Lad. Placed 2nd as Reserve Champion at Dressage Ireland 4yr old Championships 2014.  Won at BE100, placed 2nd at Tullymurray CNC* – only her second ever 1* event.  6 Eventing Ireland points, 32 Dressage points. She would suit a competitive amateur rider or a professional to realise her full potential as she has been bred and produced to go all the way.

 

cat

Excellent 1.40m showjumper: Talented and experienced mare that has competed up to 1.40m level successfully in Ireland as an 8 yo. This big scopey mare has a good canter and a brilliant attitude in front of her fences. Proven to be brave and careful over her fences and should go on to jump even bigger tracks. Suitable ride for either amateur or professional rider.

 

The Rising Popularity of Greys

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

 

Horse Scout are seeing more grey horses getting bought than ever- why is this?

 

cevin

 

If we go back a few years and look at stallions that have been particularly in vogue for the last decade, names like Cevin Z, Cicero Z, Lucky Sky and Corland come up. Go back even further and we all remember the illustrious Milton, ridden by Horse Scout Ambassador John Whitaker. These striking grey stallions have produced progeny that rival their own good looks and are proving to be world beaters in their own right.

There is an increasing trend of competition riders who are opting to buy a well bred and beautiful grey horse to compete. Even Charlotte Dujardin is part of the movement, riding her lovely dapple grey six year old Florentina, by Vivaldi. Perhaps in equestrian sports where there is a level of subjectivity like showing, pure dressage, and the dressage element of eventing, a head-turning grey will earn us a few extra marks? Or maybe we just want an attractive horse to look at?

Horse Scout are showcasing a number of extremely well bred grey horses that are bred for dressage, eventing, showjumping and showing.

 

pollyl2

Super Event Prospect by Myspires Revolution (Stanhope’s Diddicoy)

Sport Horse Grey Filly 3 years 16.2 hands. Prim is out of Twinkle Toes, graded with SHB GB, who is by Crown Graphite (Selle Francais). Awarded Higher First Premium at 2016 BEF Futurity in 3yo Eventing section. Qualified for the Futurity Equine Bridge selection day under saddle as four year old. Special opportunity for someone to own a stunning and kind horse with amazing potential.

 

 

coral

Vodka Luge 6yo Grey Mare By Shutterfly

Out of a proven advanced event mare by Accondy. Now jumping around 1.10/1.15 BS. Placed, finishing on her dressage score at her first 90. Now competing 100′s unaffiliated finishing on her dressage score. She will be the whole package for someone, flashy type that’s easy enough for a amateur but plenty of talent for a professional to take on. Only broken last winter hence not at Novice level now.

grey

Freestyle R Grey Gelding by Corland

Fantastic 16.2hh 6 yr old Dutch Bred by Corland out of an Inductro dam. A lovely horse who is fantastic on the flat and is already a winner in pure Dressage competitions at Novice level with scores up to 80% !!! He also really jumps, with scope to burn and all the credentials to be produced into a top class event horse. At present being competed on our behalf by Willa Newton.

 

 

georgiestrang-0-frvmxueb-162656

Perfect Junior / YR Team Horse By Jumbo

Grey gelding 16.1hh 10yo with a near immaculate record at Novice, Intermediate and 1*, with the ability to continue this form at 2*. He has 67 BE points. He is incredibly reliable, consistently jumping double clears and always rises to the occasion. He has 3 correct paces, is very careful show jumping and bold cross country. Results include 1st Hambleden CIC1*, 3rd Rockingham Intermediate 2016, 6th Nunney Intermediate 2016, 7th Aston Intermediate 2016

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Be a Brilliant Buyer – And your Professional Trader will find you a perfect partner.

The advantages of buying form a professional Trader is that their reputation rides with you. Top Tips for making right decisions when buying a horse.

Many of Horse Scouts Professional Trainers and riders also sell horses. Generally they buy in or breed horses which they train and compete before selling on. Sometimes they do the same with horses owned by sponsors or clients. This is true across all disciplines, Eventing, Showjumping, Dressage, Showing and Endurance etc. This is part of their business.   Their skill is in being able to make the most of a horse, to optimise its potential at whatever level. You can be sure that a young horse will have had the best start to its training, a horse with competitive potential will have been carefully progressed and given the right opportunities and in the case of rehabilitation or retraining a horse will be back on track and ready to go on to lead a happy useful life.

When horses do well in their competitive arena (or, if they are new to the discipline or young, they will be gaining experience at grass roots level) with a top trainer on board, their successes are a reflection of the trainers skill and reputation. Horses which are bought to the market fit for purpose help a professional trader build a reputation and repeat custom. It is not in the interest of a professional rider to produce horses which are going to fail to support their business by being suitable for purpose.   Professional riders have the skill and experience to ride all sorts of different horses and know how to ensure that each horse is given a prgramme which is right for them.

However as a buyer you also have responsibilities to ensure that a Professional Trader can help you make the right choice when buying a horse.

When you look through the Horses for Sale listings on a site like Horse Scout you certainly have a lot of good horses to choose from.

However, it is fair to say that buyers have an obligation to honestly represent their skill level, the accommodations they can offer a horse, and their intentions to the seller they are contacting.

There are certainly an infinite number of tales that illustrate less than ideal partnerships but to be fair to the sellers it can come down to the failure of the buyers to asses their own situation or communicate honestly with the seller. Remember that no horse is ever “finished.” They are sensitive creatures that continue to learn new behaviors throughout their lives. A novice horse person can inadvertently “undo” professional training faster than a terrier will snatch and swallow the family hamster. Here are some thoughts about buyers responsibilities.

  1. If you make an appointment to go look at a horse, don’t leave the seller hanging by not turning up. If you can’t make it for some reason, or will be later than scheduled, call your seller. It’s the polite thing to do, after all.
  2. If the horse’s price is more than you want to spend, ask the seller whether it’s negotiable before you make an appointment. If the seller says no, you won’t be wasting your time or his.
  3. Bring your hard hat, and wear appropriate clothing and footwear for riding. Do not assume to wear spur of to carry a whip.
  4. You can ask if it’s okay to bring your own saddle. A seller would need to be sure your saddle is in good repair (intact tree, leather not weak or rotten, etc), and that it fits the horse you are trying. This provides two advantages. You’ll be using tack that’s familiar, and you’ll know whether your saddle fits the horse you’re considering.
  5. Turn your cell phone off while you are trying a horse. It’s rude to take the seller’s time with personal calls and a suddenly ringing phone may frighten the horse.
  6. Do not bring your dog. Many farms have their own dogs, and the sellers won’t appreciate the disruption of yours running around. Also, your dog may chase or injure the seller’s horses, or other animals.
  7. If you have small children and plan to include them, bring along someone to mind the kids while you concentrate on the horse. Unattended children with horses can be extremely dangerous.
  8. Be honest about your abilities and level of riding. If you have an ethical seller, he will want to sell you a suitable horse. If your seller is an experienced horse person, he’ll know pretty quickly how adept you are by watching you with his horse, so don’t fudge; it’s not worth it.
  9. A horse is an individual and frequently develops a relationship with the person who rides it most often. If your seller rides the horse first and the horse seems very well trained, don’t be disappointed if the horse doesn’t perform quite as well when you get on. Even subtle differences in riding technique can produce very different responses from the horse. It may just be a matter of time and a little professional help before you and your new horse become a team.
  10. Don’t be surprised if the seller wants you to begin in a small area, like a paddock or round pen. He may want to assess your skills, for your own safety and for that of the horse. However, be wary of a seller who doesn’t offer a larger area (a ring, arena or pasture) once he’s comfortable with your abilities. Dishonest sellers know that a horse may be fine in a round pen but will bolt for the hills in a open pasture.
  11. Ask the seller about the horse’s daily routine and feeding schedule. A horse that is turned out every day and is eating grass or a little hay could turn into an entirely different horse if you buy it, keep it in a stall and feed it grain. Ask your seller about the level of activity the horse is accustomed to; is it ridden every day, every week, once a month? If you buy a horse that has been worked regularly, but you plan to ride once a month, your horse may not be as easy to handle after a month of leisure. Conversely, if the horse goes from being ridden once a month to your enthusiastic regime of five days a week, the horse may become sore (as you probably will). You’ll go home and relax in your hot tub. Your new horse might buck, rear, kick, toss its head, or refuse to move because that’s the only way it has to indicate pain.
  12. Take note of the bridle and bit used by your seller. Consider buying something similar if the horse works well and seems relaxed.
  13. If you are shopping for a horse for your child, its looks, cosmetic blemishes and color should be the least important factors in choosing. Look for an older horse, and plan to spend more.

Your seller might ask you:

Details of your experience with horses

What sort of support you’ll have; for example, a trainer, a very experienced friend, riding lessons, etc

Buying a horse starts with a telephone call and ends with a great new relationship.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Are you about to buy a horse? Horse Scouts’ Bloggers top tips for finding you a horse that can be your perfect partner.

You know what discipline you want your horse to excel in, show jumping, dressage, eventing or showing but one of the most important aspects of a horse you are looking after and riding is his temperament.  For the average Jo its important that you actually like your horse…..not just love what he does!

So here is Horse Scouts Bloggers “Top Temperament Check List”

Assessing your potential purchase’s personality and behaviour is something you should do as well as having him vetted, not instead of.

When speaking to the vendor have a list of questions ready. It is far better for you both to establish with the vendor exactly what you are looking for and what areas of ease of handling are important to you.  Horse Scout has a quality list of professional horse dealers and trainers, they know their job and, at the end of the day, do not want to sell you a horse which is unsuitable.

So write down, in five clear areas, in the order of importance to you the horses behavior:

1. Behaviour around other horses

2. Behaviour when interacting with you and other people

3. Behaviour when in his stable, yard, paddock and strange environment

4. Behaviour when loading

5. Behaviour when mounting and when being ridden

When you go and see the horse and observe him note how he is in each of these areas and if you have doubts be prepared to ask further questions, the inside knowledge of the current owner  will help you clarify things which may be worrying you .

Other considerations when buying your horse:

Have you really carried out all the checks necessary to make sure he is the best horse for you and your discipline?

You may have decided that you want a show jumper, an eventer or simply a horse that you can enjoy hacking out on. No matter what your aspirations are, it is essential that you do more than just ensure the horse is up to doing the physical job required of him.

Regardless of how talented a horse is physically, if he has behavioural issues, such as bullying or is difficult to be handled whether that be by you, a farrier or even the dentist – the relationship can turn sour very quickly. You may even find that your colleagues at the yard start too resent him being around – and instead of having a horse you can enjoy, you find yourself having to deal with problems on a daily basis.

Behavioural problems can manifest, becoming so severe that to solve them you have to get the assistance of a professional trainer whose specialty is rehabilitation.

Visit the horse at his existing home more than once – although going only once or twice will not give you the time to gain a complete picture and insight into his personality and behavior, if you zone in on his attitude it will give an indication of how he is going to be with you.

Horse Scouts Professional horse dealers are experienced horse’men who know their job and want to make sure you find the right horse for you. So be honest with the vendor about your abilities, what you want to do with the horse and your experience.  It would also be helpful if you where able to tell them something of your training routine and whether this included lessons with a professional trainer etc.  All this helps the trader find you the perfect horse.

High Viz Tabards – Are you accepting liability for an accident if you wear a tabard stating ‘caution young horse’?

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Is it safe to be seen in public? – Is it cool to be safe?: looking at some riders you would think the answer was “No”! How can that be; it’s a completely dotty way to approach your own safety, the wellbeing of your horse and the lives and safety of other road users.  A half ton of horse on top of a smart car does not make for a happy outcome; whoever is at fault. It’s the least you can do to let Drivers know you are there and that you are riding an animal which could react adversely in a stressful situation.

HRSA has some good advice about road safety and horses and they point out that there appears to be a great deal of confusion surrounding the issue of the tabards which state ‘caution young horse’.

If you wear a tabard with a message on it there are a number of factors to consider in relation to whether or not you are admitting liability in the event of an accident.

Wearing a tabard in itself it is not an admission of liability.

Whether or not a rider wearing a tabard with ‘caution young horse’ is found liable for an accident will depend on the accident circumstances.

Each case will be assessed on the evidence at hand.

In order to be liable for an accident there must be negligence on the part of the rider and wearing a tabard with the words ‘caution young horse’ is not in itself grounds for a successful claim in negligence.

If you look at various scenarios in which wearing a tabard might be worn its is easy to think of a situation in which a horse and rider were proceeding correctly along a country lane and a vehicle suddenly and without warning veered in to their path causing injury.

The rider will not be held liable on the basis that they were wearing a tabard stating ‘caution young horse’.

Likewise if a horse and rider were correctly proceeding down a country lane towards a bend and a car, travelling in the same direction, came past too close and too quickly whilst sounding its horn to warn oncoming drivers that it was coming around the bend and the horse spooked the rider would not necessarily be held as negligent merely because he/she was warning others that they were riding an inexperienced horse.

In the second example it could be argued on behalf of the rider (whether on a young horse or not) that the driver was negligent in that he/she failed to pass wide and slow, failed to wait until it was safe to pass and failed to appreciate that horses are unpredictable (despite the best efforts of the rider) when he/she sounded the horn. It would be argued that the driver was negligent and that as a result of said negligence the rider/horse sustained injury.

In such a situation council would go on to argue that the fact that the rider was wearing a tabard with the wording ‘caution young horse’ means that the driver should have taken even greater care to not spook the animal.  It would be argued that the reasonable driver, especially on seeing the writing on the rider’s tabard, should not have sounded his/her horn. Rather he/she would have waited until the horse had proceeded around the bend before passing wide and slow.

The difficulty and I suspect the confusion surrounding this comes from the fact that in many instances the Defendant may well attempt to use  the fact that the rider was on a young horse to his/her own advantage. The Defence could attempt to play on the fact that the rider was on an  inexperienced horse. If there are no independent witnesses and the third party driver says that the horse in fact jumped into the middle of the road despite him/her attempting to pass considerately, striking his/her vehicle the court might be more inclined to believe that an inexperienced horse would be more prone to such behaviour.

If a rider failed to wear a tabard warning drivers that the horse that they were riding was inexperienced and this later came out in the course of proceedings this too could be used against the rider. The argument could be that the rider failed to warn other road users that there was an increased risk of the horse spooking.

Unlike in criminal, law the burden of proof for civil proceedings is that, on the balance of probabilities (i.e more than 50%) your account of the accident circumstances is correct.

In summary each case will turn on its own evidence and wearing a tabard which reads ‘caution young horse’ does not automatically make the rider liable in the event of an accident.

If you are involved in a road traffic accident whilst riding your horse it is vital that you instruct a solicitor who is a specialist in dealing with equine accident claims. The lawyer will need to collate all of the evidence and prepare your case based on the facts. In some instances a collision investigator might need to be instructed to prepare a report to assist with liability. In such instances the accident location will be attended, the damage to horse and rider assessed and speed of the 3rd party calculated etc

However, wearing a fluorescent vest whilst out hacking on roads is vital and should always been worn for your own safety.  I don’t know how many times I have seen riders wearing their expensive Ariat or Toggi outfits become totally camouflaged in the shadow of a leafy overhanging tree on a country lane.  I cant stress how dangerous it is (as a driver) if you cannot see a rider and his horse.  You would never see a runner or a cyclist who is not aware of the necessity of being seen in good time by drivers. For some reason being safe is so often seen as uncool by the riding community, but its less cool to end up splatted on the road and causing hurt or damage to others or your horse.

Buying a pony? – 5 top tips for pony poppits

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Off the lead rein? This next stage is so important.

You need a pony who is rock solid and has experience under his belt…. millage on the clock.

A landmark Study asked children ‘Would you rather play simply for fun, or would you prefer to win?’…. 95% said FUN

So your child has outgrown her first pony, and possibly a second, and has been riding off the lead rein, independently and happily and has shown no signs of reluctance to play with the pony nor to ride it, then he or she may be ready to take the next step.

1. Ask about his background, he is likely to have had two or even three owners, can his history be traced?

2. You need your child to practice, practice and practice more, so don’t be swayed by looks or tempted into buying a young pony “with Potential” at this stage.

3. This next pony will be giving your child the confidence to ride independently, start jumping small jumps, do gymkanas or perhaps even go to Pony Club Camp or at least pony club training sessions and perhaps even progress to grassroots competitions.

4. Most of all though this pony is to have as much fun on as it is possible to fit in!

5. Look for a pony who fits well, try not to be tempted to look at this next purchase as “something your child can grow into” remember confidence comes from feeling safe and being adventurous comes from …feeling safe.

So pick experience, temperament and size as your priorities with pony Number two.

There are a few school-masters advertised on Horse Scouts Ponies for Sale pages, which do sound like wonderful ponies., but as a second pony perhaps

Morwyn Bronze Calypso – Burnham on Crouch, Essex for £2,850 does stands out. His advertisement say he is a fun, safe, well bred registered Welsh Sec B Gelding with so much potential. He would ideally suit a second competition pony, but is also a confidence giver and would be safe for novice. He is jumping comfortably (and winning) at 2.6 but can clear 3.6 at “chase me charlie”. He has never been lame or sorry, no laminitis or sweet itch. Teeth and vaccinations are up to date. I have owned this pony for 7years and had him professionally backed 4 years ago and he has been in constant work ever since. He has sadly been outgrown and needs to find a new rider. Calypso will sell with his entire wardrobe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note that by recommending a purchaser look at advertisements on the Horse Scout site Horse Scout nor its agents can be held liable or responsible for the suitability or not of any pony registered on its for sale pages.

Buying an All-Rounder? -When do you worry about a swelling?

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

When is a bump just a lump?

Are you looking for a horse for sale? One who has a few miles on the clock; the perfect all rounder who is experienced and safe?  Maybe you have seen a few and have noticed that some of them have swellings above the fetlocks on two or four of the legs. There can be many reasons for this and one reason can be hard work which can cause windgall swelling in a horse’s fetlock

What is a windgall? – Windgall is a term used to described the soft swellings often seen just above the fetlock on the forelegs and hind legs of older or hardworking horses, they are not warm to the touch. Windgalls in horses can be seen in many horses in full work – especially in the hind legs. The amount of swelling in a windgall can vary according to the weather – often being more filled in hot temperatures. Horses with hot swelling should be fully investigated by a vet before even considering purchasing.

Although windgalls on a horse’s legs can be an unsightly blemish they do not usually cause lameness – they do are not classed as an unsoundness unless they are causing lameness.  Below are descriptions of the different types of windgalls and they will help you decide if you should worry or not.  However if you are unsure always consult your veterinary surgeon.

SYNOVIAL FLUID IN EQUINE WINDGALLS – A layman’s science

Windgall swellings on the fetlocks occur when the tendon sheaths above the horse’s fetlocks become filled with synovial fluid.

All horse or pony’s joints contain lubricating synovial fluid within a sac or capsule which prevents the fluid leaking away into the surrounding tissues. In the case of the fetlock, the capsule extends out of the back of the actual joint and forms a pouch above the sesamoid bones behind the cannon bone.

If this pouch of the joint capsule becomes thickened or distended, the resulting swelling on the back of the fetlock is known as an articular windgall.

The tendon sheath, in contrast, has nothing to do with the joint and is best

imagined as a sausage of fluid which envelopes the tendons as they run over the back of the fetlock.

At the upper limit just above the level of the sesamoid bones, this fluid filled sausage lies close to the skin, so that any distension will cause a bulge between the flexor tendons and the suspensory ligament – the tendinous windgall.

TENDINOUS WINDGALL

Of the two types of windgall in horses, the tendinous windgall is the most common and least likely to reflect any real trouble.

Tendinous windgalls are often seen in middle aged horses and ponies who have worked hard – in many cases the swelling actually represents thickening of the membrane lining the sheath rather then free fluid. Tendinous windgalls come and go in some horses and ponies.

ARTICULAR WINDGALLS

Articular windgalls are more likely to be an indicator of genuine disease, as they appear in cases of degenerative joint disease of the fetlock and in certain traumatic conditions.

They are also seen in a great number of ‘normal’ horses who never show any signs of lameness over a protracted period, appearing as firm bulges between the back of the cannon bone and the suspensory ligament.

Many showjumpers, eventers, hunters and ponies develop stiff fetlocks which cannot be passively flexed to the normal extent and which carry articular windgalls all the time.

These horses appear to cope well with these inflexible fetlocks and, although they might pose a dilemma for a veterinary surgeon examining the horse for soundness prior to purchase, the horses go on, season after season.

‘WINDGALLS’ APPEARING BELOW THE FETLOCKS

If a windgall-like swelling appears below the horse’s fetlock, on the back of the pastern, this usually represents a swelling of the lower part of the flexor sheath of the tendons, rather like an upside down tendinous windgall.

Such swellings should be viewed with suspicion, as they may indicate that the sausage of the sheath is being compressed in the middle, making both ends bulge.

Compression is usually due to a contraction of the annular ligament which runs in a thick hand around the back of the fetlock from one sesamoid bone to the other, looping over the tendons.

Should this structure become inflamed or tightened, abnormal pressure will be placed on the tendons and their sheath, restricting the free movement of the tendons over the sesamoids.

This condition, known by a variety of names like Annular Ligament Disease or Desmitis of the Annular Ligament, causes a chronic low grade lameness which may resolve with a period of treamnet and rest, only to return when the horse is brought back into work