Tag Archives: selling

Horses for sale are sold correctly with Horse Scout

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toddy-sell

Making sure your horses for sale are sold correctly with Horse Scout

The majority of us who have ever sold a horse will have experienced tyre kickers, joy riders, greedy agents and trainers with their own agenda. Then there are the international scammers who want to buy the horse from a video without questions- just send all your bank details to that man in Nigeria. It is these individuals who make the selling process an unpleasant experience.

The Legal aspect

Unfortunately when you come to sell a horse, whether you have owned it for a decade or a week you do not have many legal rights and buyers know this. If you are a commercial set up, individual or professional rider who has put expenses for horses through the books, then that makes you a dealer.  It makes no difference if you have owned the horse for years and are selling at a loss.

From a legal point of view, horses are considered as goods. Therefore the jurisdiction relating to the sale of goods applies to them. The law provides people buying from a dealer, significantly more protection than it does as against a private seller.

When someone buys from a seller acting in the course of their business, section 14 of the Sales of Goods Act 1979 will impose terms into the agreement for sale, such as that the horse is of satisfactory quality and fit for the purpose it is being bought for. What this means is that the purchaser has the right to annul the contract and return the horse if it is not in compliance with these terms. For example, if the horse has a behavioural problem that was present prior to the date of purchase, which the buyer only discover after the sale. The buyer is then entitled to a full refund and it is even up to the seller to pick the horse up at their own expense.

However, in the words of an world renowned and highly regarded horse dealer (who shall remain nameless) “you sell the horse not the rider”. Meaning that horses can be ruined very quickly by an unsuitable rider. The good news is that the seller does have some legal rights in this event.

The law regards the purchase of a horse as being the purchase of an unknown quantity. They call it “caveat emptor”, essentially meaning “buyer beware”. So the buyer is responsible for examining the horses thoroughly for suitability and quality before handing over any money. An agreement for the sale of a horse depends both on “express terms”- those specifically agreed between the parties and “implied terms”, which are the conditions implied by the law.

So if you are looking to sell a horse, we have come up with our tips on how to make the process as pain-free as possible. Some may seem obvious but we would hate to say “I told you so”.

  • Honesty is ALWAYS the best policy. If you want to establish and keep a good reputation, it’s never worth deceiving people. We are probably all fools for buying a horse in the first place but not many of us are as ignorant as we may seem, we do our due diligence and insincerity will always come back to haunt you. The horse world is a bitchy place and a hive of gossip and slander- a bad horse is not worth a lifetime of abuse. Remember as a horse seller, many buyers think of you as about as trustworthy as a used car salesman. So surprise them by being totally upfront about a horse’s weaknesses, imperfections and history. It’s a win-win situation and reverse psychology can be an effective tool.
  • Sell quality, correctly produced horses. Quality always sells and usually quickly, meaning less overheads. If you limit yourself to more quality than quantity, you will secure a solid reputation in the industry and have people banging down the door trying to buy your horses. Something ridden with pleasure, is seldom made without effort. You cannot make a Grand Prix dressage horse in two months but train him to stand still when the rider mounts, to load easily and jump around a course without head-butting the rider.

Resist buying it in the first place, solely because it is cheap. Find something desirable that preferably ticks the three boxes- temperament, talent and conformation.

If you do end up with a bad one, consider whether it is worth the effort of trying to make it a good horse. There are other dealers out there who won’t ask the questions and care less about their own reputation.

 

  • Lame horses lose time and money. This goes hand in hand with honesty. If you know it is not 100% on a circle then the vet examining it, certainly will and that just makes you look a fool. There are buyers out there, brave enough to take a punt so if the horse cannot be given time to recover, drop the price and be upfront.

 

  • Market your product. Buyers are unlikely to be convinced to come and look at a horse with blurred iPhone photos and a video filmed from 200 metres away. It can take time to make a horse presentable and make him stand square but it is worth it in the end, whatever the value. So lose the shabby pink headcollar and the muddy legs. Stand him on level ground and throw a few carrots in the air to make him smile for the camera. It’s like internet dating- first impressions do matter!

 

  • The skill of advert descriptions. Make it comprehensive but concise. Imagine you are a journalist or marketeer and try and hook your audience with the opening paragraph. Height, age, sex, purpose and a few buzz words to sum up temperament, looks or ability eg unbelievable scope, wow paces, ultimate schoolmaster. It won’t work on everyone but it helps if you seem positive and excited about the horse you are selling.

 

  • Price appropriately. If you really want to sell, ask a fair price for what the horse is worth today, not what it will be worth in three months’ time after intensive schooling and three wins under it’s belt. When working out price, consider the obvious- the horse’s age, history of soundness, level of training, rideability but also the time of year and your location. It is no myth that the same sound competition horse will command a higher price in affluent part of the country which is easily accessible, than it would if it was based on the North coast of Scotland. Remember everyone likes to feel they are getting a bit of a deal, so be prepared to take something off the asking price. On the other side of the coin (excuse the pun), too cheap will sound alarm bells.

 

  • Realism saves time. Ask the buyer early on, what they are looking for and an honest appraisal of their riding ability. Take a written note of this, it may be useful if you ever get caught in a legal battle over the unsuitability of a horse. Evaluate from their description, their background and their riding as to whether this horse will cope with the partnership. Measure your horse’s height with a real stick rather than relying on what it says in the passport, estimated when it was a yearling.

 

  • Be courteous and prompt Even with suspected time wasters. Respond within 24 hours, even if you cut and paste a ready-made “template”, including video links. Serious buyers will usually pick up the phone first but the downside of living in a digital age is that many people are almost scared of picking up the phone. Keep all prospective buyers in the loop about a horse’s status eg just won a British Novice, still for sale etc. Even if they decide your horse is not for them, be polite and wish them the best of luck in their search. They may end up coming back another time if they enjoyed dealing with you. Or if you know someone selling a horse which may be more suitable, it is always worth sharing. They are more likely to return the favour.

 

Testimonials

“We’ve used Horse Scout for selling horses and I have also been to see horses to buy. There is always a huge selection and you can target exactly what you are looking for.” – Emily King FEI 4* Event Rider. 

“We have advertised multiple horses with Horse Scout and have sold horses quickly and efficiently. We find that responders to the Horse Scout advertisements are genuine and knowledgable horse people which makes advertising with Horse Scout very appealing because you know the horses are going to capable caring homes. The personalised service Hannah and her team provide makes advertising quality horses easy” Alex and Suze Peternell International Event Rider

“I have been using horse scout for the past 8 months. It is a fantastic contribution to the successful running of my business. Easy to use, great service from Hannah. I would recommend to anyone.” Dan Sibley International Event Rider 

 

Written by Ellie Kelly

Photography credits to Libby Law

Top quality Showjumpers for sale on Horse Scout

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Horse Scout  horses for sale classifieds are selling the best horses on the market.

£100,000
Jaffar is an extremely competitive winner at 1.40m and 1.45m level with an incredible list of results including winning every 7yo GP in MET 2 2016. if you like to win then this is the horse for you.
STATS – 16.2hh 8yo gelding, sire Lord Z and damsire Darco.

jaffar

 

POA

Very powerful and careful gelding with a great technique over the jump, competitive in 1.30m classes and placing in 1.40m. Never stops, no vices, with a proper training will progress to Grand Prix. Ranked 18th in the Gold League.

STATS – 17hh 8yo Westphalian gelding, Sire Stedinger, grandsire Sandro Hit

anfisa

 

£35,000
This quality homebred is a fantastic model of a horse with a fabulous technique over his fences. He has a great amount of scope and is a prolific winner in his class. He has won a 6 bar contest, won 1.30m and qualified Blue chip B&C final. Grade A with wins too numerous to mention. A horse for the future with a great amount of talent.
STATS – 16.3hh 8yo Warmblood gelding by Darius

euro

 

£16,000
Fabulous opportunity for ambitious rider looking to gain more experience at the higher levels. Scooby has jumped up to 1.40m level – jumping at the big UK arenas including Hickstead (Derby Stakes) and Royal Windsor and out in Vilamoura Portugal in 2016. Good on the flat with 3 good paces, good flying changes and a great working attitude. Ridden and jumped in a snaffle mouth, This experienced horse really knows his job.
STATS – 16.3hh 11yo bay Selle Francais gelding, sire Iolisco De Quinhon

jnb

 

 Are you looking to sell you horse, or have a horse for sale? Sign up to Horse Scout today or call the team freephone on 03339 398353 for assistance.

Why You Should Consider Horse Shopping in Ireland

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Contrary to belief, a day out horse shopping in Ireland can be a fun and highly cost-effective way to view a multitude of extremely well bred, potential and proven, Irish competition horses in a short space of time.

Within an hour of Dublin airport, you will find several highly reputable breeders, producers and competition yards with quality stock for sale at sensible prices.  Ireland is renowned for many things but breeding great horses and making Guinness easily come top of the list.

Next time you are looking for your next competition horse, consider a quick day trip to Ireland instead of planning several long drives around England and Scotland to view individual horses. Why not view 6-8 horses in one day to find the horse of your dreams?

Equally, if you’re looking to buy more than one horse, you could plan a weekend trip in order to visit a few big yards. Some breeders and producers will offer overnight hospitality so you’ll leave Ireland having made new friends as well as buying new horses to add to your current string.

If you want to set your pulse racing then you should visit one of the many esteemed sports horse sales in Ireland. The atmosphere was electric at Goresbridge Go For Gold and the Supreme Sale of Showjumpers in November, and I have no doubt the horses they sold will be gracing the top of the leader boards in the very near future.

 

How To Get There

The cheapest and quickest way of getting to Ireland is typically by aeroplane; flights from most regional airports start from just £18! No need to pack a good book as you’ll be landing before you know it; the flight takes approximately one hour. Most Irish breeders help arrange pick up from the airport or will collect you in person.

Ferry is another option and costs range from £50-£180 depending on how far in advance you book and what date you travel on. The ferry isn’t the quickest or cheapest means of getting to Ireland but having your own car does mean you can drive around Ireland at your own leisure and travel further afield to view horses.

Travelling by train is the third option with return tickets from your own local train station starting at approximately £78.

 

Three Quality Irish-Based Horses For Sale on Horse Scout

stafford

1.35m Perfect Young Rider HorseISH Bay Mare rising 8 years 16.1 hands.  Grade A mare with 375 points. She has multiple wins and placings at 1.30m – 1.35m level. She jumped clear in the Hankook 6/7 year old Grand final at Cavan Indoor Championships September 2016. She is a serious speed horse and tries her heart out in the ring. Would be a top horse for a competitive young rider or experienced amateur.

 

kaynolan

Super Rising 7YO CIC* Event HorseBeautiful grey ISH mare 17hh rising 7 years old by Carrick Diamond Lad. Placed 2nd as Reserve Champion at Dressage Ireland 4yr old Championships 2014.  Won at BE100, placed 2nd at Tullymurray CNC* – only her second ever 1* event.  6 Eventing Ireland points, 32 Dressage points. She would suit a competitive amateur rider or a professional to realise her full potential as she has been bred and produced to go all the way.

 

cat

Excellent 1.40m showjumper: Talented and experienced mare that has competed up to 1.40m level successfully in Ireland as an 8 yo. This big scopey mare has a good canter and a brilliant attitude in front of her fences. Proven to be brave and careful over her fences and should go on to jump even bigger tracks. Suitable ride for either amateur or professional rider.

 

A very useful Horse Sales Contract Template

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HORSE PURCHASE CONTRACT

 

 

This agreement is made the _______ day of _______________ 20__

 

Between: ________________________________________________________

(the “Seller”)

Whose address is: _________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

 

And: ________________________________________________

(the “Purchaser”)

 

Whose address is: _________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

 

Covering the sale of the horse known as: _______________________________

(the “Horse”)

 

Passport No: _____________________________________________________

 

Freezemark No: ___________________________________________________

 

Microchip No: _____________________________________________________

 

Height: ______________________________________________________

Colour: _____________________________________________________

Sex: _____________________________________________________

Age: _____________________________________________________

 

For the sale price of £ ______________________________________________

(the “Price”)

  1.  The Seller hereby warrants that they are the legal owner of the Horse and has the right to sell the Horse.
  2. The Seller declares that the Horse’s details above are accurate and true. The Seller declares that the details given in the sale advert (see below) are accurate and true: (Insert the advert published of the horse for sale here.)
  3. The Seller declares that the following oral statements made to the Purchaser are accurate and true:(Insert any oral statements or claims made by the Seller affecting the decision of the Purchaser to purchase the Horse.)
  4. The Seller declares that the Horse has exhibited no stable vices or behavioural problems whilst in their care, except as detailed below.(Insert any known stable vices or behavioural problems here.)
  5. The Seller declares that the Horse’s vaccinations for flu and tetanus are up-to-date.The Seller declares that the following additional items are the legal property of the Seller and are included within the Price.(Insert any tack and equipment included in the sale price here)
  6. The Seller declares that to the best of their knowledge the Horse has no unsoundness or health problems that would make the Horse unfit for general riding work.
  7. The Seller makes no warranties or representations whatsoever regarding future fitness and performance of the Horse.
  8. Upon receipt of a deposit of £ _____ from the Purchaser, the Seller shall issue a dated receipt to the Purchaser and agrees not sell the Horse to another party for a period of one week.
  9. The Purchaser has the right to arrange at their own cost a pre-purchase veterinary examination and the Seller agrees to make the Horse available for such.
  10. Such pre-purchase veterinary examination shall be carried out within one week of payment of the deposit.
  11. Should the Horse fail the pre-purchase examination the Purchaser has the right to terminate this Agreement with immediate effect and upon such termination the deposit shall be repaid to the Purchaser.
  12. Upon acceptance of any pre-purchase veterinary examination, or where the Purchaser has waived the right to a pre-purchase veterinary examination, the Purchaser agrees to pay to the Seller the balance £ _____ for the Horse within one week of the deposit being paid.
  13. Should the Purchaser fail to pay the balance within one week of the date of deposit, the Seller has the right to terminate this Agreement whereupon the Purchaser shall forfeit the deposit paid.
  14. Upon payment of the balance, the Seller shall provide the Purchaser with a dated receipt for payment and hand over the Horse’s passport to the Purchaser.
  15. Upon payment of the Price in full the Horse shall become the property of the Purchaser.The Purchaser agrees that they will arrange for removal of the horse from the Seller’s premises at their own cost within 2 days of payment of the Price in full.
  16. This Agreement shall be governed by the law of England and Wales/Scotland*.* Delete as appropriate.

 

Signed: ____________________________________________________

(The “Seller”)

 

Date: __________________________

 

Signed: _____________________________________________________

(The “Purchaser”)

 

Date: __________________________

 

Buying a horse starts with a telephone call and ends with a great new relationship.

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Are you about to buy a horse? Horse Scouts’ Bloggers top tips for finding you a horse that can be your perfect partner.

You know what discipline you want your horse to excel in, show jumping, dressage, eventing or showing but one of the most important aspects of a horse you are looking after and riding is his temperament.  For the average Jo its important that you actually like your horse…..not just love what he does!

So here is Horse Scouts Bloggers “Top Temperament Check List”

Assessing your potential purchase’s personality and behaviour is something you should do as well as having him vetted, not instead of.

When speaking to the vendor have a list of questions ready. It is far better for you both to establish with the vendor exactly what you are looking for and what areas of ease of handling are important to you.  Horse Scout has a quality list of professional horse dealers and trainers, they know their job and, at the end of the day, do not want to sell you a horse which is unsuitable.

So write down, in five clear areas, in the order of importance to you the horses behavior:

1. Behaviour around other horses

2. Behaviour when interacting with you and other people

3. Behaviour when in his stable, yard, paddock and strange environment

4. Behaviour when loading

5. Behaviour when mounting and when being ridden

When you go and see the horse and observe him note how he is in each of these areas and if you have doubts be prepared to ask further questions, the inside knowledge of the current owner  will help you clarify things which may be worrying you .

Other considerations when buying your horse:

Have you really carried out all the checks necessary to make sure he is the best horse for you and your discipline?

You may have decided that you want a show jumper, an eventer or simply a horse that you can enjoy hacking out on. No matter what your aspirations are, it is essential that you do more than just ensure the horse is up to doing the physical job required of him.

Regardless of how talented a horse is physically, if he has behavioural issues, such as bullying or is difficult to be handled whether that be by you, a farrier or even the dentist – the relationship can turn sour very quickly. You may even find that your colleagues at the yard start too resent him being around – and instead of having a horse you can enjoy, you find yourself having to deal with problems on a daily basis.

Behavioural problems can manifest, becoming so severe that to solve them you have to get the assistance of a professional trainer whose specialty is rehabilitation.

Visit the horse at his existing home more than once – although going only once or twice will not give you the time to gain a complete picture and insight into his personality and behavior, if you zone in on his attitude it will give an indication of how he is going to be with you.

Horse Scouts Professional horse dealers are experienced horse’men who know their job and want to make sure you find the right horse for you. So be honest with the vendor about your abilities, what you want to do with the horse and your experience.  It would also be helpful if you where able to tell them something of your training routine and whether this included lessons with a professional trainer etc.  All this helps the trader find you the perfect horse.

New Pony for a new season? Lovely all rounder

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Bernwode Bugatti – bay gelding in buckhorn Weston  Somerset  £6,500

Same home for 5 years, Beautiful 9 yr old bay gelding. 13hh Bernwode Bugatti is an extremely elegant and talented pony, with 3 correct paces and a wonderful attitude to work.

He is expressive in his training and dressage, effortless over a 90-show jump course and brave across country- a very special pony in a small package! Bugatti is exceptionally well bred.

He has great breeding. His sire is the German pony FEI dressage Stallion Bernwode Brokat who has represented Great Britain on numerous occasions, and sired countless high achieving offspring, including Bugatti’s full brother (Bernwode Broadway) who is currently a member of the GB squad. Bugatti’s dam, Bernwode Mandy has also, produced two approved stallions and a German National champion show jumping pony, along with the FEI level event mare Bernwode Nairobi.Bugatti is well educated, working at elementary/ medium at home and frequently gaining over 70% in affiliated competition.

Bugatti would be a great fledgling pony, small event pony or working hunter pony. Qualified summer regional’s 2014.

Has represented BYRDS South West at Sheepgate u25 championships.

Bugatti is a true pleasure to own, loves to hack, good to box, shoe with vet etc. This is an extremely sad sale, and his future home must be a 5* competitive and loving one.

Are you looking for a pony for this coming season who seems to be able to turn his hand to anything? This certainly sounds like a lovely pony.

Are you looking for a coloured horse?

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A fantastic collection of coloureds at Country Farm Stud.

Karen Raine’s fantastic set up in Lancashire has every combination of coloured horse that you can imagine!, What a place, an equitation centre ‘par excellance’ and also a world renowned stud.  The majority of her Sports Horse Stallions are Homogenous coloureds (i.e. coloured stalliions which breed similar coloured foals) Established for 20 years Country Farm Stud has grown from a small family run stud to one of the largest Sports Horse Stud Farms in the UK with the underlying reason for this growth being customer referrals and recognition.

As well as standing the stallions there are many other sides of the business into which it has diversified. These now include semen freezing & storage along with other stallion services & has attained DEFRA approval for EU export of semen. It is an approved A.I centre for chilled semen & also has a large education & training department.

As well as various plain competition stallions we are t he home of three of only seven Performance Elite Graded Coloured stallions in the UK & the only Premier Performance Elite Graded stallion in the UK.

Karen Raine Stud owner & Manager is an Equine Lecturer with Cert Ed qualification, NVQ Assessor & specialist Breeding & Performance Horse Assessor as well as a BHS Int SM & A.I technician. In putting these qualifications to use the Education and Training side of the business has grown with extension to the training facilities. Both full and part time students are taken for Work Based Diploma Courses (NVQ) throughout the year. We pride ourselves in producing employable students who have gone onto very good careers within the industry both here and abroad.

Country Farm Stud also has some fantastic coloureds for sale including Country Class Act at £2,750 last years quality colt foal (can geld) by Country Top Dollar out of a Lone Rnager mare. Super sport horse youngster who has the conformation, presence and paces to exceed in any sphere.

Country Joker at £3,950 a Stunning 3 year old gelding currently standing approx 16hh. He was to keep but I just don’t have the time to do him justice. This young man has it all, as a foal he won the SHB NW points over the season and took 2 Championships and a Reserve Supreme. He is out of a retired show jumping mare who went on to become a prolific show brood mare and also has numerous Grade A show jumpers in his pedigree. He has the looks movement and conformation to make a HOYS show horse and has the scope to show jump or event. Pictures are in his winter woollies but even so his quality shines through. He is well handled and can be backed if required, and :

Country Polka Dot  £3,950 a striking 5 year old homozygous Sports Horse Mare 16hh by Dual Elite Graded stallion out of Clover Hill mare. Very unusually marked this mare will stand out in a crowd, hard to see on pictures but she has paw prints on both sides. A super ridden or breeding prospect this mare has it all breeding, paces and jump. Backed and turned away to mature she is now back in work. She has three established elevated paces, hacks out and jumps coloured and rustic courses. She has the most super temperament in and out of the stable and is a pleasure to own and work with. Only for sale as we do not have time to compete this super mare.

These horses are all noted as being suitable for or with potential as: all rounder, showing or sports horses.

Horse Scout is very pleased to see such a high profile breeder and centre on its lists, so welcome to Karen Raine.

Buying an All-Rounder? -When do you worry about a swelling?

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When is a bump just a lump?

Are you looking for a horse for sale? One who has a few miles on the clock; the perfect all rounder who is experienced and safe?  Maybe you have seen a few and have noticed that some of them have swellings above the fetlocks on two or four of the legs. There can be many reasons for this and one reason can be hard work which can cause windgall swelling in a horse’s fetlock

What is a windgall? – Windgall is a term used to described the soft swellings often seen just above the fetlock on the forelegs and hind legs of older or hardworking horses, they are not warm to the touch. Windgalls in horses can be seen in many horses in full work – especially in the hind legs. The amount of swelling in a windgall can vary according to the weather – often being more filled in hot temperatures. Horses with hot swelling should be fully investigated by a vet before even considering purchasing.

Although windgalls on a horse’s legs can be an unsightly blemish they do not usually cause lameness – they do are not classed as an unsoundness unless they are causing lameness.  Below are descriptions of the different types of windgalls and they will help you decide if you should worry or not.  However if you are unsure always consult your veterinary surgeon.

SYNOVIAL FLUID IN EQUINE WINDGALLS – A layman’s science

Windgall swellings on the fetlocks occur when the tendon sheaths above the horse’s fetlocks become filled with synovial fluid.

All horse or pony’s joints contain lubricating synovial fluid within a sac or capsule which prevents the fluid leaking away into the surrounding tissues. In the case of the fetlock, the capsule extends out of the back of the actual joint and forms a pouch above the sesamoid bones behind the cannon bone.

If this pouch of the joint capsule becomes thickened or distended, the resulting swelling on the back of the fetlock is known as an articular windgall.

The tendon sheath, in contrast, has nothing to do with the joint and is best

imagined as a sausage of fluid which envelopes the tendons as they run over the back of the fetlock.

At the upper limit just above the level of the sesamoid bones, this fluid filled sausage lies close to the skin, so that any distension will cause a bulge between the flexor tendons and the suspensory ligament – the tendinous windgall.

TENDINOUS WINDGALL

Of the two types of windgall in horses, the tendinous windgall is the most common and least likely to reflect any real trouble.

Tendinous windgalls are often seen in middle aged horses and ponies who have worked hard – in many cases the swelling actually represents thickening of the membrane lining the sheath rather then free fluid. Tendinous windgalls come and go in some horses and ponies.

ARTICULAR WINDGALLS

Articular windgalls are more likely to be an indicator of genuine disease, as they appear in cases of degenerative joint disease of the fetlock and in certain traumatic conditions.

They are also seen in a great number of ‘normal’ horses who never show any signs of lameness over a protracted period, appearing as firm bulges between the back of the cannon bone and the suspensory ligament.

Many showjumpers, eventers, hunters and ponies develop stiff fetlocks which cannot be passively flexed to the normal extent and which carry articular windgalls all the time.

These horses appear to cope well with these inflexible fetlocks and, although they might pose a dilemma for a veterinary surgeon examining the horse for soundness prior to purchase, the horses go on, season after season.

‘WINDGALLS’ APPEARING BELOW THE FETLOCKS

If a windgall-like swelling appears below the horse’s fetlock, on the back of the pastern, this usually represents a swelling of the lower part of the flexor sheath of the tendons, rather like an upside down tendinous windgall.

Such swellings should be viewed with suspicion, as they may indicate that the sausage of the sheath is being compressed in the middle, making both ends bulge.

Compression is usually due to a contraction of the annular ligament which runs in a thick hand around the back of the fetlock from one sesamoid bone to the other, looping over the tendons.

Should this structure become inflamed or tightened, abnormal pressure will be placed on the tendons and their sheath, restricting the free movement of the tendons over the sesamoids.

This condition, known by a variety of names like Annular Ligament Disease or Desmitis of the Annular Ligament, causes a chronic low grade lameness which may resolve with a period of treamnet and rest, only to return when the horse is brought back into work

10 helpful hints when buying or selling horses

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Horse Scout has a great website for buyers and sellers alike. The sales and professional pages are full of information and clear to read.  This makes it so much easier for both buyers and sellers. Having all relevant information sorted into categories make it easy to make informed choices when looking at the horses form or potential.  Good photographs make a difference to a viewers initial decision and Horse Scout offers both stills and video footage.

10 Helpful Hints when Buying or Selling Horses

1. As a seller write your advert carefully and be accurate in your description, don’t advertise your horse 100% in traffic if you have only ever ridden him down quiet country lanes. Both Sellers and Buyers should keep a copy of the advert which can be useful if there is a dispute in the future.

  1. If you are having the horse vetted which is always recommended, do not use the regular vet of the seller. You must instruct an independent vet and pay for the vet direct.
  2. If it is important that the horse is good to load, ask to see him load. If you ask the seller to confirm that the horse is vice free get the seller to warrant that the horse is vice free by writing it down. As a Seller if you have told the Buyer that the horse is green and has never been ridden out alone before, for example, write this down and ask the buyer to sign it acknowledging the fact.
  3. Don’t buy a horse without its passport.
  4. Be realistic about your abilities – don’t over horse yourself.
  5. If you discover a problem with your horse inform the seller immediately and keep copies or notes of all correspondence.
  6. When you go to try or look at a horse to buy always take an experienced person with you if you are a novice.
  7. If the Seller is selling on behalf of someone else, if appropriate contact the Owner direct. Whenever looking at a horse ask lots of questions about vices, what it has done, its breeding, competition record, laminitis, sweet itch, lameness etc.
  8. Cut your losses – If all has gone wrong and you end up with an unsuitable horse, come to terms with the fact and don’t always insist on litigation which can be expensive, consider selling it to a more suitable home. As a Seller if a horse proves to be unsuitable for a Buyer consider taking the horse back and finding an alternative buyer, if the horse is genuine this shouldn’t be a problem.
  9. Always have a written contract, with details of the buyer, seller, price and warranties (if any) given signed by both parties.

Ten Top Tips for Picking a Pony

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Top Tips for Picking a Pony

This is your child and as every parent knows we all want to make our child’s first experience on a pony a happy one.  It is so important to build confidence into these first few years.  There is time enough for bombing about and simply having fun, falling off and being put back on are all part of the learning process but if your child is scared then you wont be buying a second pony let alone be trailing her around to shows and buying her her first competition pony in the future.

  1. When you are looking for a pony for sale the first top tip would be DON’T TAKE YOUR CHILD WITH YOU.  Otherwise in no time at all the heart will be ruling the head and you may have made an awful mistake.
  2. Make a short list of possibilities and then go and visit them, preferably with someone who is very experienced and able to judge the suitability of a pony for your child, before taking your child to see the very best of your short list.
  3. The pony must be 100% quiet at all times, safe from the ground and when being ridden.
  4. Make sure you see the pony being led by a child to asses the relationship.
  5. Watch a child riding on and off the lead rein.
  6. If possible watch an experienced rider on the pony to asses its way of going.
  7. Make sure the pony is comfortable to sit on.  Wide but not too wide.
  8. Make sure the pony is a good size. Not too big and not too small, although small is definitely preferable to too big.
  9. Find out if the pony suffers from conditions like sweet itch and laminitis.  These need not necessarily preclude a sale (or loan) but they need managing, so make sure you know what this involves.
  10. Think about what is going to happen to the pony when your child has grown out of it.

That aside those top ten tips what other considerations do you need in order to make the right decision?

Even though you may have had a wonderful experience with your own first pony, you have probably come across many people who have been bitten, kicked, or ones with “runaway pony” stories. Most of these people either no longer ride, or are reluctant to ride because of the bad experiences they had as a child.

Finding a trainer for your pony and for your child:  Whilst experienced trainers who are small enough to ride your childs first pony are thinner on the ground than others it is worth taking the time to find the right trainer.  As your child progresses from his first pony or even onto his third and starts competing then it is important that your instructor can help with schooling and correcting any issues that arise with the pony.

Children are generally small and inexperienced and need someone to help keep everything on the straight and narrow. One way to do this is to ensure that the pony has enough exercise and is schooled regularly.

Enjoy your child’s delight in their first pony and I hope that this venture into the world of horses is a positive one.