Tag Archives: professionals

International Eventing Forum 2018

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International Eventing Forum 2018

Ellie Kelly


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A healthy turnout of eventing supporters turned out for the 2018 edition of the International Eventing Forum. An event which has been held in the UK since 2004

 

The theme for this year was “What’s the limit?”. The sport of eventing has evolved considerably in the last 20 years. Dressage technicality has taken on a new meaning and the quality of work and horsemanship required in this phase has increased radically. When Cross-country switched from long to short format, it reduced the influence of stamina but brought more emphasis on technicality and mental as well as physical agility in horse and rider. In turn, show jumping has become more demanding, requiring a greater level of training and precision than was previously the case.

 

Through a variety of topics and between four highly regarded professionals, the  big question posed at this insightful day was “how far can we actually push the boundaries in our sport to keep up with obvious performance improvements of both horse and rider”. But in a sport where amateurs compete alongside professionals, how can  we raise our game without becoming elitist and alienating the enthusiastic amateur?

 

Former International Dressage rider Sandy Phillips, is a familiar face in the judges box at many of the world’s FEI events. In eventing she judges at Three and Four star and she endeavoured to unveil what the judge is looking to see, in order to gain the higher marks.

 

With two competent demo riders in Tom Mc Ewen and Jonty Evans, Sandy put them through their paces and gave a critical commentary. Overall, her focus was on “riding the jump” with your seat and creating as big a step as your horse’s balance can cope with. “To impress the judge, Event riders need to be more confident in riding forwards in the dressage arena and use those corners as much as possible” she said.

 

Eric Winter followed with some useful tips both for riders and coaches. He worked with three young riders, all riding young and green horses. He set up a number of simple jumping exercises to emphasise what the basics of good jump training were. “Circles are the foundation for all riding. Not just in dressage but in jumping in the way that course designers put jumps on turns or curving lines. So you need to be able to ride a circle perfectly. As a rider you should have three questions when approaching the fence

1) Is your horse genuinely taking you or are you pushing it?

2) How straight are you on the line to the fence

3) Is the rhythm regular?

The rider should be focusing on this but it is up to the horse to find it’s feet at the pole if it has been correctly presented” he explained. “Repetition of an exercise produces an understanding on the horse of what is happening. Be patient with exercises to allow the horse to buy into the process and in doing so, gain confidence. Teach a horse to look for fences around corner. It is when they are surprised that they make bad decisions.”

 

After lunch, Performance Psychologist Charlie Unwin delivered his philosophy on mind management and how the mind can limit the body when under pressure. The Horse Scout advocate talked about the importance of only allowing yourself to focus on positive psychology. And how he helps rider to achieve what is known as “flow state” a level of 100% focus and concentration whilst delivering a performance. “Your thoughts have a way of sinking into your hands, your legs, your seat and the whole of your body so a lack of self- belief can be the biggest barrier to improvement and success.”

 

Charlie also discussed “Identity” to the audience. “This is the story you tell yourself about yourself. We ask ourselves “Who am I?” But you should be saying “Who do I want to be?”. The warm up arena is the biggest example of this, a place where riders often become shells of themselves. Instead riders should embody the mind beliefs and body of a World Class Rider. It is common for riders not to even consider themselves as an athlete but instead as simply an instrument to get the best out of the horse. In order to become an athlete you need to think like one as well as training and preparing like one” he said.

 

The final session was led by Frederik Bergendorff, a former international event rider and Gold medallist at the 1993 Europeans, Frederik now holds the role of Team Sweden’s Eventing Manager.

 

He worked with four star riders Imogen Murray and Ludwig Svennerstal and highlight what the basics of good jump riding really were for all levels of rider. He reinforced the importance of the warm up and quality preparation. “Your horse must be totally through from behind before you start jumping.”

 

His focus was on doing the basics better in training and he laid his principles out clearly for spectators. “Don’t go up a level or do something new in a schooling exercise unless you have mastered that one. To approach a fence you should have pace, energy and a good frame in the horse before the turn so that as you approach you can just concentrate on keeping the balance and rhythm. Being in balance means the rider should be sitting in the middle of the horse and you train balance with your seat. If you approach is correct then there should be no need to look for strides, the fence will find you. On landing from a jump, you should press the horse forward to the hand from the leg. Not only will this save seconds in the ring but it will stop him falling on the forehand.”

 

The International Eventing Forum will return to Hartpury  on the 4th of February 2019 and the speaker will be announced on http://www.internationaleventingforum.com/ soon.

#IEF18

Three fantastic opportunities at Lucinda Fredericks’ Yard, Rosegarth in Wiltshire

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Horse Scout keeps an eye on its lists and when possible will blog or tweet on behalf of the professionals who have profiles of themselves, their yards, their horses and any horses they have advertised for sale.

  1. For A professional Rider from May 2015

A Fantastic Opportunity for a professional rider to rent 6 – 10 boxes at Lucinda Fredericks’ Yard in Wiltshire from May 2015. Rosegarth offers every facility for the competitive rider including : 30 m x 60m outdoor school, stabling with rubber matting, wash area with state of the art solarium, lunge pen, covered horse walker, rower and rub show jumps, gated access and an alarmed tack room and a full onsite security system. We are located within superb on and off road hacking. Opportunities for tuition from Lucinda Fredericks.

We will ensure your horses are completely cared for on a daily basis including mucking out, feeding (using Pure feed and hay), turning in/out, grooming, tack cleaning and exercising.

Facilities:

24hr onsite supervision

Designated lorry parking

Excellent off-road hacking

Horse walker

Hot water washdown

Individual turn out

Lunge Pen/ Separate school

Mirrors around school

Non-individual paddock turn out

Onsite communal tea & coffee facility

Onsite shower & changing rooms

Outdoor school 20m x 60m or over

Solarium

Stabling

Undercover horse walker

Current Onsite Professionals: Lucinda Fredericks (Aus) Oliver Smith (GB) Emily Young-Jamieson (GB) Thomas Heffernan Ho (HK) Nicole Pearson (HK)

Horse Scout Blogger also notices that Rosegarth are also advertising for staff on their website as follows:

2.A Temporary Full Time Groom

We are currently seeking a temporary groom, full time over 6 days to start immediately.  This is a great opportunity for someone wanting to gain experience working on an International Eventing yard as part of a fantastic and friendly team.  Excellent on site accommodation is available.

3.And a Working Pupil Position

We have a new opportunity for a working pupil to join us with or without their horse asap. Closing date: extended to 31 March 2015

This is a great opportunity for someone wanting to experience life on an International Eventing yard as part of a fantastic and friendly team, whilst developing your own, and your horses career.

Case Study: Zoe joined us in August 2014 as a Working Pupil, she has shown herself to be a hardworking member of the team who is quick to learn and is a joy to be around. Due to her commitment and enthusiasm we have worked with her to transfer her onto an apprenticeship scheme and she is now working towards a level 3 qualification with us.

Zoe commented “Lucinda is someone I aspire to be like and what more could you want than being at her yard itself. In five years time I see myself and my own horse competing regularly in different disciplines, surrounded by and being part of a determined, hard working team. My ambition is to run my own yard for breaking, schooling and competitive livery”.

Simulated riding sessions – Stay Sober and Smile. Try Leggless at Quob Stables in Hampshire

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Horse Scout Blogger is bouncing today: Well, I wish I was!  Have you ever thought about perfecting your aids or checking how straight you sit?

I was looking at Daisy Jacksons’ Profile on Horse Scout’s Professional Trainers lists and saw that her pyhsio therapists ‘The Balanced Rider’ had Access to a Horse Simulator.

The simulator The Balanced Rider practice use stands at Quob Stables, a smart Equestrian Centre in Hampshire and they offer sessions on “Legless” (brilliant name) for around £35.00. They say that their Dressage Simulator is fun and comfortable to ride. It is ideal to teach riders of all levels, ages and abilities.

The Interactive Dressage Simulator is the most valuable and realistic instructional aid in dressage. It teaches the rider position and control, it develops technique, skill, muscle memory and confidence. It is possible to complete the test and then play it back on the screen

The Advantages listed for riding a simulator are:

1. For the instructor

  • Close proximity to students when teaching

2. For the rider

  • Safe practice for nervous riders
  • Safe and controlled environment
  • Learn the correct posture in minutes
  • Recover from injury with safe measured steps
  • General fitness

3. For everyone!

  • All weather training

The simulator is the same size as a real horse and its action is very close to the natural feel of a real horse. When riding in the simulated arena, the rider is drawn in to the sensation of actually riding in a real ring.

As a teaching aid to help pin point exactly how to give the aids for new movements or to check that you are applying aids correctly, sitting straight, etc this seems like a gift.  Perhaps it could be a gift for someone you think would benefit from a session with their trainer or one from Quob…I wonder if Daisy Jackson has ever tried it!

Daisy is a professional dressage rider, based in Dorset/Hampshire training her current horse to PSG, competing at Advanced Medium. She was on the GB Junior Squad 2012-2013 with International Grand Prix horse Saint Swithens. She has trained with some impressive professionals herself; squad training with Stephen Clarke and Sandy Phillips, and also top trainers such as Dan Greenwood and Nicola Buchanan. Sshe was selected for the High Performance programme and received training with Olympic riders and international judges including Jennie Loriston-Clarke, Anna Ross Davies and Judy Harvey. Daisy is currently training with Nicola Buchanan, Gareth Hughes and Nicky Barrett. Holds Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence. Training towards UKCC. Available by appointment for training. If you are looking for a trainer in Hampshire contact Nicky here.

for The Balanced Riders practice click here

 

10 helpful hints when buying or selling horses

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Horse Scout has a great website for buyers and sellers alike. The sales and professional pages are full of information and clear to read.  This makes it so much easier for both buyers and sellers. Having all relevant information sorted into categories make it easy to make informed choices when looking at the horses form or potential.  Good photographs make a difference to a viewers initial decision and Horse Scout offers both stills and video footage.

10 Helpful Hints when Buying or Selling Horses

1. As a seller write your advert carefully and be accurate in your description, don’t advertise your horse 100% in traffic if you have only ever ridden him down quiet country lanes. Both Sellers and Buyers should keep a copy of the advert which can be useful if there is a dispute in the future.

  1. If you are having the horse vetted which is always recommended, do not use the regular vet of the seller. You must instruct an independent vet and pay for the vet direct.
  2. If it is important that the horse is good to load, ask to see him load. If you ask the seller to confirm that the horse is vice free get the seller to warrant that the horse is vice free by writing it down. As a Seller if you have told the Buyer that the horse is green and has never been ridden out alone before, for example, write this down and ask the buyer to sign it acknowledging the fact.
  3. Don’t buy a horse without its passport.
  4. Be realistic about your abilities – don’t over horse yourself.
  5. If you discover a problem with your horse inform the seller immediately and keep copies or notes of all correspondence.
  6. When you go to try or look at a horse to buy always take an experienced person with you if you are a novice.
  7. If the Seller is selling on behalf of someone else, if appropriate contact the Owner direct. Whenever looking at a horse ask lots of questions about vices, what it has done, its breeding, competition record, laminitis, sweet itch, lameness etc.
  8. Cut your losses – If all has gone wrong and you end up with an unsuitable horse, come to terms with the fact and don’t always insist on litigation which can be expensive, consider selling it to a more suitable home. As a Seller if a horse proves to be unsuitable for a Buyer consider taking the horse back and finding an alternative buyer, if the horse is genuine this shouldn’t be a problem.
  9. Always have a written contract, with details of the buyer, seller, price and warranties (if any) given signed by both parties.

Endurance Riding – without getting saddle sore

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Are you thinking of stepping up a notch in endurance riding or perhaps thinking of taking it up?

Get the low down on Endurance riding with Bella Fricker Endurance Trainer

Endurance riding is gaining in popularity in the horse world but as Endurance GB says it isn’t for the faint hearted, and it isn’t for the rider who doesn’t actually enjoy being in the saddle for long stretches.

So what is Endurance Riding? It is a unique competitive challenge and a supreme sport for learning about equine fitness.

Riding over long distances is all about Tactics and this is one of the pleasures of Endurance Riding – you think about it, plan your tactics, plot your directions, work: out where your back up crew (for longer distances) will meet you, anticipate how you will ride. An examination of your map, provided by an EGB ride organiser, will raise your awareness on sections which will slow you down and where you may be able to make up time on faster going. Yes, you will learn to read a map!

All Endurance Riders check their whereabouts on a map carried in a case, and never just follow the rider in front.

There are two reasons for this. The first obvious one is, they may be lost too and not admitting it, and secondly it is part of the adventurous spirit of Endurance Riding – you are there pitting yourself and your horse against the elements, riding unknown territory, and finishing’ exactly where -you should, back at the venue. A real sense of achievement that gives meaning to the old saying “To finish is to win”.All routes are also marked.

Enjoy the Camaraderie

Another element is the spirit of camaraderie which exists amongst the riders. ENDURANCE GB  is always happy to put you in touch with a more experienced rider who can advise you; EGB organisers are happy to talk about their rides and EGB regularly stages talks, seminars and demonstrations across the regions. Their support is wide ranging and practical, and in this sense, what is refreshing about the sport is that you need never be alone.

If it is your first ride and you feel a little nervous the  Ride Secretary may be able to arrange for you to ride with someone who is familiar with the sport. Set speed rides, for example are competitive only in the sense of personal achievement, so a friendliness between riders is commonplace. You will find sections of the ride where you need to reduce speed for whatever , and part of the fun is the conversation with other riders along the way. When you meet again at another ride, you will be meeting friends both old and new.

When the going gets tough

The toughest challenges are presented by the Competitive Endurance Rides (CERs), where riders are competing against each other, rather than the clock. The highest level of competition is the 160km (100 mile) CER, the International Senior championship distance.

Something to aim for

Whatever level you are happiest a, Britain’s top endurance riders are among the best in the world and you can always learn from them and aspire to follow in their footsteps. Endurance GB is the internationally recognised body for the sport of endurance riding in the UK. Membership of EGB means you and your horse can be considered for British team selection. Each year, EGB puts together young rider, intermediate and senior teams and arranges for them to compete in international endurance riding events.

Building Partnerships

Perhaps the best reason of all for taking up Endurance Riding, is the partnership built up with your horse over these many miles – of new riding ground. You guide him, and he carries you, and the relationship ‘which is forged between endurance rider and endurance horse would be hard to equal in any other sport. He has to trust you to lead him back home, and you have to trust him to get you there, and the resulting confidence will stay with both of you in any future sports you may try. That’s if you’re not hooked on Endurance Riding for life!

To find out more about endurance riding speak to Bella Fricker Endurance Trainer or take a look at the Endurance GB website where the above information came from

 

 

Professional Profile – Lucinda Fredericks

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Eventing Olympian Lucinda Fredericks is an international trainer and travels extensively to give clinics and demonstrations as well as hosting training sessions at her own venue, Rosegarth, near Devizes view her Horse Scout Profile HERE!

How special would it be to buy the rider in your life a gift voucher for a private session with Lucinda Fredericks?

Her schedule for clinics for this year shows that she is in Hong Kong  at the end of a five day marathon of 5 days clinics and training out there.  As an official trainer of the Hong Kong Event Team, who took Bronze at the Eventing in the  17th Asian Games in 2014 (well done them!) On this trip she has been training the riders on horses which are retired from the Hong Kong Racing Circuit and she says how proud she was of the young racehorses retraining at her clinic (yesterday) in Teun Mun as they jump happily over 110m. And at this moment (according to her Facebook profile) she is putting a very handsome chestnut retiree through its paces over some XC jumps at Beas River Equestrian Centre.

Her experience and support of the Retraining of Reacehorses was also demonstrated at the The Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Centre  near Preston who have some fantastic pictures, taken by Trevor Holt and Ashley Stewart of a demonstration she hosted to a crowd of around 300 people in April – the event raised around £3,000 for the TRC.

With so many awards for Retraining of  Racehorses perhaps a group of individual training session with Lucinda on your own retired racehorse would help you along the way to one of the awards being offered by ROR Grassroots Eventing Series for 2015

There may be time to book places at the clinic at Charlotte Wadley Equestrian, Painswick, on the 7th February . (Individual spaces cost £60 + VAT (within a group of 4). Alternatively you can contact Lucinda’s team through Horse Scout to arrange for a session at her training centre.

She is holding clinics in February in  Holland  and Dorset, March in Berkshire and then she is back out to Hong Kong at the beginning of April

If you cant wait that long to see Lucinda then she will be talking about her Olympic experiences with Headley Britannia and Flying Finish, at the Equine Client Meeting in Frome at 7.30 pm on Wednesday 25th February being orgainised by Garston vets.

 

 

Freelance Grooms and Instructors are you covered?

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Freelance grooms are defined as those professionals who work part time for different employers ,, trainer or instructor allows a degree of flexibility to both parties and also on a casual cover basis i.e. when permanent staff are sick or on holiday.

View Horse Scout grooms available here 

For clients looking for training, which is provided by a professional instructor, at home on their own yard the same freelance insurance cover principals would apply.

From the point of view of the professional offering a service to others it is essential that in todays litigious society we must protect ourselves from being sued by a third party and Freelancers are no exception. Whether you are an instructor, trainer or a groom you must protect yourself. Likewise those who employ trainers and outside horse help must make sure they are covered by appropriate insurances. The BHS offer Public Liability cover with their membership. Which for freelance instructors would protect you if the person you are teaching on their own horse was to fall and sustain an injury and you were found to be legally liability for the injury. Furthermore if as an instructor or groom you were to ride or handle someone else’s horse and the horse caused any third party property damage or bodily injury whilst doing so then the policy would protect you should a claim be made against you.

However for the professional freelancer it might be advisable to consider a more compressive policy e.g. SEIB who, unlike the BHS include care, custody and control for horses under your care.

Care Custody and Control cover is an optional extension to the public liability and would protect you as the instructor or groom should a horse whilst in your care, custody or control be injured and the owner of the horse were to claim against you for the injury. For example if a groom was clipping a horse and accidentally cut the horse, the owner of the horse may claim from the groom for the resulting vets fees from the accident.

Also it should be noted that anyone employing members of staff must carry Employers Liability and is essential cover if you were to have a helper or student to assist with your freelance instructing or groom duties. The cover protects you as the ‘employer’ should the helper or assistant get injured whilst carrying out their ‘employed’ duties.

 

 

What’s the Problem?  

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Are you struggling with the way your horse is going?

Frustrated when you compete and time and again the same things happen.  Is it your horse or is it you? Working alone and never seeming to make progress?: its like working in a vacuum.  Let someone take the pressure off you.  There is a saying that a problem shared is a problem halved and there is nothing truer in the horse world.  Having someone on the ground to analyse your riding style and approach and the way the horse is going under you is invaluable. Finding the right trainer will revolutionise your approach and your enjoyment of your horse.

 Horse Scout has just the person you are looking for.  Click through and find yourself on the road to a successful partnership…

HISTORY IS MADE AT BURGHLEY

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HISTORY IS MADE AT BURGHLEY AS ANDREW NICHOLSON CLAIMS HAT-TRICK OF LAND ROVER BURGHLEY HORSE TRIALS Avebury is the first horse in the history of the competition to win three times in succession

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/equestrianism/11080592/Andrew-Nicholson-makes-history-with-success-at-Burghley-Horse-Trials.html

Andrew Nicholson riding Avebury made history and produced a thrilling and faultless ride to win the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials for the third consecutive year. Antipodeans’ dominated the top slots with fellow Kiwi Jonathan Paget riding Clifton Promise was in 2nd place and Australian Sam Griffiths riding Happy Times dropped to 3rd place after an expensive show jumping round.

The cross-country course, designed by Captain Mark Philips, proved tricky owing to the slightly softer going and more humid conditions than riders were expecting. 24 horses were either eliminated or retired on the four mile course. Despite the good ground conditions the water elements in particular proved tough for many of the horse and rider partnerships, resulting in the 11 minute 19 second optimum time proving elusive. Sam Griffiths took an early lead, despite being held twice on the course, but was pipped at the end of the day by Andrew Nicholson who’s horse Avebury must know better than any horse.

With just 12 clear rounds from the 39 riders that started the final show jumping phase, Nicholson entered the arena knowing he needed a good performance in order to be crowned the victor. Whilst Sam took the pressure off by having two fences down, Jock Paget’s round was faultless The atmosphere was tense with silence falling amongst the crowd for Nicholson’s round. The sell-out grandstands went wild when they cleared the final double.

He concluded: “I didn’t feel that cool during that I can tell you. He’s a good jumper, he’s been there and done it all, I don’t have to worry about him getting nervous with all the people I just have to keep calm and ride him like I normally ride him. It’s a big team effort when you have a horse like this who has now won this three times in a row, they’re as passionate as I am that he does well. For me, I’ve had a very bad year this year, I threw away Badminton on Nereo, and I shouldn’t have fallen off when I did. The World Equestrian Games, I was ninth when I wanted to get a medal so I’ve been putting quite a lot of pressure on him to win here. Hopefully I will be able to go to Kentucky and go for the Rolex Grand Slam but I am a little light on horses at the moment, so we will assess in February and see how we are going.”

 

For those who didn’t watch the Burghley coverage on BBC 2, Clare Balding rounded up Burghley with an equestrian review of the season which took place on the Lion Bridge. She was joined by Ben Maher and Harry Meade both of whom reflected on their own personal highs and lows this season. Harry who’s horse Wild Lone collapsed and died at The World Equestrian Games described his experience out there as being the exciting but at the same time the most heart-breaking of his life. And as those of us who have ridden and kept horses can vouch, that just about epitomises horses and equestrianism- excitement and heart-break!