Tag Archives: Horse breeding uk

Laura Renwick

Laura Renwick

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Laura Renwick

Laura Renwick

Laura Renwick has retained her position of leading British female rider for a number of years. She is certainly one of the busiest riders on the circuit and admits to sometimes competing more than 10 horses in a day. Perhaps surprisingly, Laura only started competing seriously at 26.  We caught up with the 44 year old at the Equerry Bolesworth International Horse Show, to hear her story and find out what the season holds.

 

“I’ve got two top horses. Top Dollar VI has more ability than he has ever going to need but the rideability is always going to be a bit iffy so I have ruled myself out of selection for the World Equestrian Games this year but I am looking more towards the Olympics” she explains.

“I’m a bit short on top Grand Prix horsepower but we started breeding from some of my competition mares a few years ago and they are just starting to come through. So I’ve got some really promising young ones and hopefully this time next year, some of them will have reached fruition.”

Laura is married to former elite show jumper John Renwick, who gave up the sport in 2002 to focus on supporting his wife. She juggles competing all over the world with running the equestrian business and being a mother to son, Jack.

Amazingly it wasn’t until after the birth of her son that she started to make a name for herself as a rider. For many women, having children can force competitive sport to the back seat. Quite the opposite has happened for Laura, whose sporting career really started to take off after childbirth.

Introduced to horses by her mother, who owned a riding school, Laura was successful in show jumping from the age of 11. Prophetically, she bought her first jumping pony from John, her future husband.

At the age of 18, she questioned whether she wanted to make a career out of it and gave up competing for several years. “I was lucky that my parents supported me up to 18 but then but then I had to go it alone. This sport is tough, especially for anyone starting out and trying to support themselves. At the time I thought I should try something else.

Her sabbatical included being a flight attendant for BA and living in Spain. “If I had my time again I would have stuck at show jumping because it really is in my blood. That’s why I came back to it all these years later.”

Laura returned to the sport at the age of 25. She bought a young horse, which meant starting again from the beginning. Soon after, she met her husband on the competition circuit. To begin with it was purely a business partnership but it later evolved into marriage and parenthood.

“We bought some young horses together and in the early days whilst John was still riding at the top international competitions, I was producing the young horses. These are the horses that I am still riding now so it’s all been a working progress, we’ve learnt together. I think that’s why I have such a strong bond with our horses; we know each other inside out.”

As well as her training skills and empathy with horses, Laura is renowned for her fearless, competitive spirit. On a good horse, she would be hard to beat against the clock and has won a number of Puissance competitions. She won the prestigious Olympia Puissance last year, clearing 7ft on Top Dollar VI

A combination of skill, poise and style has garnered her sponsorship and she even took part in a risqué photography shoot to promote British show jumping. “It was a laugh and done to raise the sport’s profile, but I probably wouldn’t do anything like it again.”

This year Laura was asked to be show jumping ambassador for The Brooke charity’s “Every Horse Remembered” Campaign. I’m delighted to start my official support for Brooke as an Every Horse Remembered Ambassador. I’m looking forward to representing the campaign for Brooke in the British Show jumping scene” she said. “Horses have worked side by side with people for centuries, not least in the First world War. It’s vital that we remember the sacrifice they gave.

 

In order to stay in the game at this level, she and her husband have to be commercially minded. “We breed horses, train them and sell them, even some we would like to keep. John handles most of the business side of things now. He had a lot of injuries which is why I had to up my game and focus on competing.”

“We still have to make a living from it. Prize money in showjumping has gone through the roof, compared to what it used to be but you still have to have the horsepower to be at those shows with that prize money. You need to have a pool of Grand Prix horses to compete regularly at that level and the top riders have that luxury. So until you’re in that sort of league, you do still have to make your money where you can, so our horses are always for sale.”

Laura does not seem fussed that son Jack is more interested in football. “He can ride but has no interest in competing” she says. “I enjoy taking him to football training and have told him to work hard at it so he can look after us in our old age.”

The future looks bright for Laura and she hopes to consolidate her performance next season and “just keep enjoying it” she adds. Does she dare dream of future medals and team selection? “My top horse Top Dollar is more than capable. It’s just about hitting the form at the right time” she says.

 

Written by Ellie Kelly

ROYAL ASCOT: What Meghan Markle should know.

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Photo from hopedeamer1-13

300,000 people from around the world will flock to Royal Ascot this week, making it the third most attended sporting event in the UK.

 

It is one of the premier race meetings on the global horse-racing calendar since racing began. It draws the best bloodstock, jockeys and trainers from around the world and is probably the most famous fashion parade in sport. For centuries, Royal Ascot has been “the place to be seen” on the social calendar and the fashionistas, networkers and socialites arrive in their droves, some scarcely seeing a horse.

 

Because Horse Scout is all about sharing our enviable contacts and insider knowledge, we bring you hot-off-the press Royal Ascot insight, directly from ITV’s racing PR team. So here’s a few things you probably don’t know about one of the greatest sporting events on the planet.


The Royals

  • The Queen first attended Royal Ascot in 1945 at the age of 19, and has had 23 winners there since
  • Ascot is the only place at which the Queen has ever been seen running in her life
  • In the earlier days of her historic reign, she used to gallop down the track in the early mornings before racing started – In 1960 she finished fourth to other members of her party of seven in an unofficial ‘race’
  • Her reign has seen many years of social change, even at Ascot – until 1955 divorcees were not allowed into the Royal Enclosure
  • Every day The Queen and her procession travel down the straight in front of the stands at precisely 2pm - this year, Meghan Markle, the new Duchess of Sussex, is hotly tipped to make her Royal Ascot debut

 

The Fashion

  • There are four enclosures at Royal Ascot, the Royal Enclosure being the most prestigious. Each has their own strict dress codes
  • The last few years has seen the rules relaxed somewhat and last year, jumpsuits were successfully introduced in the Royal Enclosure
  • However, banned for the first time were gentlemen’s ankles and socks are now compulsory for men
  • Every year the bookies bet on the colour of the Queen’s outfit – and this year they no doubt will be doing the same with the Duchess of Sussex. ITV’s fashion expert, Mark Heyes thinks she will be “low key, sleek and elegant in a pastel shade.”

The Food and Festivities 

  • There is a 100-year waiting list for one of the coveted ‘picnic’ parking spots in the Royal Enclosure’s Car Park One
  • There are more than 100 bars and food outlets around the racecourse and 225 private boxes, with 39 professional kitchens operating during Royal Ascot
  • There are three miles of festive bunting – which is over half a mile further than the longest race
  • 60,000 finger sandwiches and 80,000 cups of tea are consumed across the five-day week of Royal Ascot – that’s almost the same number served at the three garden parties the Queen hosts at Buckingham Palace each year
  • 56,000 bottles of champagne, 44,000 bottles of wine and 21,000 jugs of Pimm’s are drunk at Royal Ascot each year, which together is just slightly less than the 128,500 bottles of mineral water.  Over the Wimbledon fortnight they drink a mere 29,000 bottles of champagne but 230,000 bottles of water
  • Despite the festivities, Thames Valley Police described Royal Ascot 2017 as a “well-behaved event” for the 300,000 racegoers

Horse Scout will be playing Paparazzi and if you are lucky enough to join the fun, please do tag us in your snaps and tweets.  at the end of racing you may want to join in the communal sing-song with a huge gathering around the bandstand.

If you can’t make it this year, you can join the BAFTA award-winning ITV Racing team at the times below. This is why you should tune in:

  • Every race live and unrivalled access to the horses, jockeys and connections
  • Fascinating racing features including ‘AP McCoy meets Aidan O’Brien’
  • Coverage of the Royal procession every day – who is there and who’s wearing what
  • The best fashion around the course from vintage to high street to high end with ITV fashion experts, Charlotte Hawkins Mark Heyes

 

Tuesday 19 June:
ITV4 – The Opening Show- 0930-1030
ITV – Live Racing – 1330-1525
ITV4 – Live Racing – 1520-1800

Wednesday 20 June:
ITV4 – The Opening Show -0930-1030
ITV – Live Racing – 1330-1800

Thursday 21 June:
ITV4 – The Opening Show – 0930-1030
ITV4 – Live Racing – 1330-1800

Friday 22 June:
ITV4 – The Opening Show -0930-1030
ITV4 – Live Racing – 1330-1530
ITV – Live Racing – 1520-1800

Saturday 23 June:
ITV4 – The Opening Show – 0930-1030
ITV – Live Racing – 1330-1525
ITV4 – Live Racing – 1520-1800

Written by Ellie Kelly

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BADMINTON- The year of the legends

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BADMINTON- the year of the legends

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The Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials never fails to make a big splash in terms of gripping action and great moments. There’s a good reason it is one of the top five most attended sporting events in the UK and it is one of just a handful of equestrian events which is broadcast on national television these days. But what played out this year was nothing short of epic. It is fair to say that the tales thrown up at the 69th edition of Badminton, should probably go down in the history books.

 

It was a great year for the girls. Jonelle Price became the first female winner in 11 years with the evergreen mare Classic Moet, a talented and long-term coupling who have been knocking on the four star door for several years. The last female winner was in 2007 and another much loved female partnership of Lucinda Frederick and Headley Britannia had their day.

 

Jonelle’s win really emphasised the significance of a strong relationship between horse and rider. Speaking after her cross-country round she said: “I felt the pressure on the cross-country that she could go near the time but you just have to get out there and do your job and I know her so well. It’s a real partnership,” she explained. After scoring one of the few clear show-jumping rounds to secure her win, Jonelle summed up her emotions: “Being a CCI4* winner is an elite club to join and it’s been something that has eluded me for a while now, so to now join it – especially here at the Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials – is very, very special.”

 

The fact that Jonelle won one of the most hard-fought Badminton’s we have seen, just eight months after giving birth to her son, was not only an incredible feat but particularly inspiring for all women, girls and working mums, whether their biological ticks or not. When she was asked whether motherhood had made any difference to her mentality or the way she rode, Jonelle responded: “No, the only difference is that when I went to get on for cross-country, I had “Incey Wincey Spider” stuck in my head, so that was certainly a first.”

 

Classic Moet- a pure thoroughbred also became a mum last year (theoretically), in the shape of two embryo transfer fillies by the stallion, Upsilon.

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In addition, there were four female riders in the top ten this year and a female dominance we haven’t witnessed at the British four-stars for some time. Britain’s Ros Canter and Gemma Tattersall took 3rd and 4th spot respectively, two ladies who should surely be heading to Tryon for the FEI World Equestrian Games in September this year.

 

With an all-star cast on the entries list, there was inevitably going to be drama, masterful riding and great action. Eric Winter made his stamp on Badminton last year, with a big bold course, which caught more than half the field out that time. This year, the general consensus from riders was that the jumps were marginally kinder but still imposing and a true four star but with the added challenge of seriously holding ground conditions and the fact that many British based riders were lacking match practice after so many early season events were cancelled.

The wet winter and further rainfall on the preceding days had taken it’s toll. When the sun shone on the first two days, it worsened conditions further making the ground tacky and together with a warmer climate it was even more energy-sapping. The result was that no rider made it around the 4.2 mile course inside the time. Yet the 74 % completions and only one serious horse injury to report, made for a fairly happy Course Designer.

Photo from hopedeamer1-12

We had three Horse Scout advocates competing: Giovanni Ugolotti, Joseph Murphy and Oliver Townend. All finished in the top 27 with a clear cross-country. Oliver was still on a high from his win at Kentucky and was hungry for the Rolex Grand Slam. He was named the new World Number One for the first time in his life. Despite some impressive performances with his two horses, he had to settle for runner up to Jonelle with Cooley SRS and fifth with Ballaghmor Class.

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Last year’s winner, Andrew Nicholson was never going to rest on his laurels and had saved Armada for the big occasion. Certainly fitting that he chose to retire his legendary and most noble steed at Badminton, in front of a teary eyed crowd. It was a poignant moment when he was led out of the arena, after a formidable 13 year career which included finishing in the top 12 at 10 four star events. As well as winning Pau four-star in 2012 and Badminton in 2017, with Andrew, Nereo was a mainstay of the New Zealand team for some time, winning team bronze and individual fourth at the London Olympics and individual and team bronze at the 2010 World Equestrian Games.

 

Emotions were raw by the time it came to Ben Hobday’s announcement that he was retiring crowd favourite Mulrys Error. The unorthodox eventer, who jumped a number of clears at four-star level and became affectionately known as “super cob” will now have a less demanding job of educating Ben’s stable jockeys. He may also be seen at some Eventing Grand Prix in the future.

 

Another “end to an era” looked like it was going to take place at Badminton, as Michael Jung was muttering something about retiring La Biothetique- Sam FBW (aka Sam) this year. The 18 year old has been quite simply the most successful eventer of all time, having won the World Championships, the European Championships, two Olympic gold medals and four out of his seven four star events, mostly finishing on his dressage score.

 

However, this year Badminton was not to be for the dynamic duo. One suspects Michi brought Sam to Badminton to win it and with an uncharacteristic two rails in the showjumping, he is unlikely to bow out with him just yet. Sam still looked like a five year old and was as spring-heeled as ever in difficult conditions, so it would be wonderful to see him at Burghley. Michi gave us an education in cross-country riding and Sam gave us one heart-stopping moment at the first corner jump into The Mound, when he left a leg, otherwise it was poetry in motion to watch.

 

We also said a final farewell to Mike Tucker, he stepped down from his BBC role last year but sadly succumbed to a heart-attack just months into his retirement. The “Voice of Equestrian” will be sorely missed. His communicated our equestrian sport with charm and wit. Mike often said the wrong thing but in this crazy age of political correctness, we loved him for his slight defiance.

 

I was there in my role as Assistant Producer for the BBC, which means I get to help make the Highlights Show, which goes out on the Sunday afternoon. I advise them on what should be covered in first place in our mini-documentary and do a number of off-cam interviews with riders. It means I really am in the thick of it and ensconced in the stables or riders lorry park for much of the week. Most of the BBC crew have never ridden a horse in their lives, which I think helps give another perspective, as we also have to educate and entertain the horse-ignorant as well as the avid enthusiast. This year, we all agreed was the best yet in terms of twists and turns, stories and fairy tale endings. Interviews with William Fox-Pitt, returning to Badminton for the first time since his serious brain injury in 2015 plus Andrew Nicholson, Piggy French and the blacksmith who had been the resident farrier at Badminton since 1953, left us all a bit emotional.

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Written by Ellie Kelly