Tag Archives: endurance

Looking at Eventers?

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New String to your Bow for the season

Eventing in mind – Looking for something special?

Have a look at Rosco, Sallybog Tim or Derroe Champ

Horse Scout has got some great prospects for the coming season.  If you are looking for a new ride for the new season scroll through the lovely horses posted here.  If you are looking for something young and ready to go have a look at Rosco Aaron Millars’ latest good looking grey Irish Sports horse which has competed in the Stepping Stones League in Ireland (equivalent to BYEH). He was placed in the finals with fences at 1.10m. Rosco has three lovely paces and does a very smart test. Great attitude, eager to learn and quick on his feet. Exceptionally neat jumping technique, real scope. Very kind natured on the ground, lovely to handle. He is now ready to go on and realise his potential with someone who can really enjoy his considerable talent and great temperament and would make a super all rounder.  In fact a great Mother Daughter combination. Born in 2009 he is still young but he is now ready to affiliate he’s ready to affiliate.  He can be seen in Dorset.

Perhaps you would prefer something a little older? Then have a look at the lovely Sallybog Tim who would make a great schoolmaster with the experience he has got under his belt.  A nice looking BE Intermediate Novice with points. Working at BD medium and handy to hunt, hack and ready to compete. A great all rounder.  He can be seen in Hampshire.

Or are you looking for something smaller.  There is a cracking looking pony called Connemara Derroe Champ based over in Ireland who has done everything and who at 14.2hh is just waiting to be a perfect gentleman on the cross country course for a lucky small person.

 

11 Top Tips – Focus list for buying your horse

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You know what you want….So keep focused when buying your horse.

You’ve made a decision and you are going to buy a horse.  My advice? …Make a shopping list first.

List everything that you want your horse to be, his minimum level of experience, how you are going to fit on him and what you want to do with him.  You can make it more detailed with specifics like age, breed, build, bone etc but promise yourself that if you write it down then you will stick to it.  So put a lot of thought into this preparatory step before even pressing a horses for sale link!

Shopping list sorted and your ready to start looking so here is a handy focus list for you to help keep you on track.

  1. Decide what type of horse you are after and stick to it. It’s all too easy to get carried away when you’re looking for a horse, so If you are after a schoolmaster don’t come home with a recently broken 3 year old!
  2. Ask yourself will this horse do the job I want him for?  “Could I see this horse in the arena, x country, hunting all day etc ?” It really helps to keep a clear picture of what you are looking for.  It is so easy to get side tracked and buy on impulse based on nothing more than the colour of a horses coat.
  3. Keep a constant eye on the market – The good ones tend to get snapped up very quickly, in the past I’ve seen them on Horse Scout in the morning and sold be lunchtime!
  4. Be prepared to take your time finding a horse – sometimes it can be a lengthy and tedious process, if the first horse isn’t right it might be the second, fifth or tenth!  And always try a horse twice – you will pick up on things at a second visit that you missed the first time around
  5. Make a list of questions and make sure you get an answer to every one before hanging up.  Let the seller talk, often as you chat you can pick up things that are not written in the ad.  E.g. “Is he quiet in the stable?” “Oh yes, burble on a bit…” followed by “of course if you wave your arms around he can throw up his head” no this might describe the horse exactly or it could be a way of saying you have to be very quiet around the horse as it spooks easily in its stable.  Bear this in mind when you visit the horse.  Don’t go mad but just see what the seller means.
  6. Ask direct questions about vices etc like weaving or windsucking, cold back etc by specifically asking the question. Technically a seller is oblisged to come clean but if he hesitates or changes the subject be wary. If this happens go aware to the visit if you still want to go ahead, this will save you time and money in the long run. Ask for a video of the horse inaction, this can be a great way of telling whether a horse is worth the time and cost of fuel of a viewing.
  7. Don’t waste peoples time If you arrive and immediately know the horse is not for you then don’t be afraid to say so, the seller should appreciate your honesty and this way you won’t be wasting your time either.  It can be difficult to be blunt but better for all concerned in the long run.  You may well make friends with the seller but they are not, at this point, your friend and will not mind your honesty.
  8. If you can then video the horse – you can watch it again and again which will help you make a decision and similarly, take someone with you that knows your riding – it can be so worthwhile to have another ‘pair of eyes’ to assess the horse
  9. Ask questions, questions and more questions! Buying a horse is a huge decision and you need to know everything you can about the horse before you commit to buying it. If the seller is genuine they will be able to answer all of them!
  10. Sleep on it.  The seller is keen to make a sale but you must be certain that this is the right horse for you.  After all you will have a huge time, money and resources tied up in your equine partner so make sure you are making a decision based on all the things that are on your shopping list and not on an impulse.
  11. Having made a decision it is advisable to get a vet check, but keep it appropriate you don’t need a 5* vetting if you are not expecting to seriously compete on your horse.  However, your vet will be able to advise you if you tell him what you want to use the horse for.

Don’t go off track, pick the perfect horse for you.  Good luck with your search and let us know how you get on.

British Dressage Team Quest – Find your perfect partners

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Its time to think about your competing strategy for next season. If you are a rider and thinking of taking up dressage or just getting out more with your horse? How about team dressage? British Dressage introduced the Team Quest competitions last year and this year it seems set to take off.

With 30 competitions scheduled countrywide in February its time to sort out some competition teams.  Each team has three or four members and the three highest scores count, with a reserve in case of any horse being unable to compete.

TQ Qualifying competitions to take place from 1 February 2015 to 31 August 2015. With eight Regional finals to take place in September, followed by a final championship to be held in November.

To take place all team members must have a minimum of a Team Quest Club membership (or any other paid category of BD membership), and all horses must have a minimum of a FREE Associate Horse Registration – This can be done online.

Teams are divided into three age categories – BYRDS Team members 16 and under, 25 and under, and Open Team riders of any age – and each competitor can chose to ride an Intro, Prelim or Novice test.

For the inaugural championship  in November 2014 there where not only prizes for the best performance but also . Best Dressed for amazing outfit coordination and inventiveness –  Which the Yahooligans took home. What caught the judges eye where the inventive clipped ribbons on the horses in support of a fellow team mate, who has competed in TQ whilst battling breast cancer. Then there is was also Best Team Spirit award which was awarded to the loud and lively u16s team, Chaos Cousins who could not be missed as they gathered round the arenas whenever their team mates competed to sing, dance and do whatever they could to settle their comrade’s nerves.

Norfolk Divas, Little Little Little and Large and The Charnwood Chancers were the three big winners at the first ever Team Quest finals over the weekend at Bury Farm, Buckinghamshire (1 – 2 November 2014).

Over the course of the two day competition, 195 competitors in 50 teams contested in one class per day – with the top three percentages from each team on each day combining to achieve an overall score.

Riders can choose which level they ride at, providing that all combinations are eligible for Intro, Preliminary or Novice (qualifiers) in accordance with BD rules.

Are you thinking of finding your perfect team horse, then have a look through our for sale pages.  Good luck with your Dressage Team Quest for 2015

 

Freelance Grooms and Instructors are you covered?

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Freelance grooms are defined as those professionals who work part time for different employers ,, trainer or instructor allows a degree of flexibility to both parties and also on a casual cover basis i.e. when permanent staff are sick or on holiday.

View Horse Scout grooms available here 

For clients looking for training, which is provided by a professional instructor, at home on their own yard the same freelance insurance cover principals would apply.

From the point of view of the professional offering a service to others it is essential that in todays litigious society we must protect ourselves from being sued by a third party and Freelancers are no exception. Whether you are an instructor, trainer or a groom you must protect yourself. Likewise those who employ trainers and outside horse help must make sure they are covered by appropriate insurances. The BHS offer Public Liability cover with their membership. Which for freelance instructors would protect you if the person you are teaching on their own horse was to fall and sustain an injury and you were found to be legally liability for the injury. Furthermore if as an instructor or groom you were to ride or handle someone else’s horse and the horse caused any third party property damage or bodily injury whilst doing so then the policy would protect you should a claim be made against you.

However for the professional freelancer it might be advisable to consider a more compressive policy e.g. SEIB who, unlike the BHS include care, custody and control for horses under your care.

Care Custody and Control cover is an optional extension to the public liability and would protect you as the instructor or groom should a horse whilst in your care, custody or control be injured and the owner of the horse were to claim against you for the injury. For example if a groom was clipping a horse and accidentally cut the horse, the owner of the horse may claim from the groom for the resulting vets fees from the accident.

Also it should be noted that anyone employing members of staff must carry Employers Liability and is essential cover if you were to have a helper or student to assist with your freelance instructing or groom duties. The cover protects you as the ‘employer’ should the helper or assistant get injured whilst carrying out their ‘employed’ duties.

 

 

Only 6 weeks until Iselham kicks off the 2015 BE Season

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Only 6 weeks until Iselham kicks off the 2015 BE Season

How about 11 Taekwondo Routines To Strengthen The Lower Body

With riders looking at fitness regimes for their horses perhaps its time to consider changing that out of bed straight to the coffee machine for some Zen lower body strengthening ready to push forward in the rankings in next seasons sporting schedule.

How many of us just crawl out of bed and try to untie ourselves with a bit of a stretch or bend as we drink that first cup of coffee?  As Horse’men we need to take care of our bodies as they are 100% involved in how well we function both on and off a horse.

Lower body is always prone to injuries and muscle pulls. This part is worked out mostly. While riding, mucking out, moving feed bales around, in fact much of our horse related activities involve bending, lifting and employing the lower half of our bodies and the lower back is particularly vulnerable, and the area most abused by incorrect lifting and poor posture when off the horse.  Its interesting how many riders can have good posture on top of a horse but walk with poking heads and rounded shoulders on the ground. It is also this portion that helps in balancing the entire body. Having a strong lower part helps a person in staying fit and flexible.

Lower backs are very prone to injuries and unnecessary pains. While sleeping, we can hurt our lower back. While climbing the stairs, we can hurt the lower back. But the chances are higher while we try to pull or carry those show jump wings or one too many haynets around.

Unless we have a strong lower back, it may well get seriously injured while doing our jobs and taking some time out to mitigate the risks by strengthening this vulnerable area can only make sense.  On the plus side if your are groaning by now! Is the added benefit of being more aware of your own body and it follows that this awareness will help you feel how your own movement is affecting your horses way of going.  A strong lower body does not mean you need to ride strongly it means that you will have more control and therefore be more proactive in engaging your horse and influencing his way of going.

Performing some basic stretches can help in strengthening the lower back region. There are several Taekwondo stretch routines that can be included in your daily fitness regime to put more stability in the lower back region. Have a look at 11 of the best lower back Taekwondo stretches to strengthen your lower back. (please take care when new forms of exercise, read through all recommendations associated each exercise before starting and take note of any recommended precautions)

1.         Supine Hamstring Taekwondo Stretch

Lie flat down on the floor with the back touching it. It will be better if there is a rubber mat placed over the empty floor surface. This will offer for a more comfortable feel after lying down on your back. However, you should lie down in such a way that the legs can rest on the wall while raised in a straighter manner.

Bend one of your leg with feet flatly placed on the ground. The other leg needs to be raised up in the straightest position possible. This leg needs to be rested on the wall to prevent falling down. Now, with both your hands, try to touch the feet or calf region. Remember, not to raise major portion of your upper body. Your abdominal muscles need to be engaged in such a manner that it can stabilise the spinal cord perfectly.

Hold for at least 10 seconds. Then, relax. After 30 seconds rest, repeat.

Precaution:

Never try to put higher pressure on your spinal cord while touching the feet or calf region. Putting too much pressure can lead to injuring the lower back.

2.         Seated Hamstring Stretch

To perform this stretching exercise, place a rubber mat on the floor. Then, sit on the mat. Legs should be in a stretched position with knees absolutely straight. Also, keep your back straight.

Now, with both the hands, try to touch the toe. During the initial days, you will not be able to touch or hold the toe for long. However, the main objective is to get your hand fingers closer to the toe, as much possible. This will generate enormous stretch to the hamstring muscle. While your hand fingers come to the closest position to toe, pause for a second or two. Then, return back to the starting position.

Repetitions: 10

Precaution: Don’t force your lower back too much while performing this stretching exercise. Obviously, a little force will be required while trying to touch the toe, but that should be marginal. Giving too much pressure to the lower back can cause unnecessary injury.

3.         Standing Hamstring Stretch

This is a fine stretching exercise not only for the hamstrings but also lower back portion.

Procedure:

Stand straight. Now, bring your right foot in front of the left foot. Right toe should be in lifted position. There should be 4-5 inches width in between the two feet. Bend you left knee marginally and then pull your abs gently inward. Lean forward and then rest both the palms on top of the left thigh. This is required to keep your body well supported and maintain a proper balance.

Shoulders should be down and in an absolute relaxed position. Never try to round the lower back region. A mild stretching pull can be felt that will slowly spread through back of the leg. Repeat this stretching exercise with your left leg forward.

Repetitions: 10 per leg

Precaution:

Those who are suffering from lower back injuries/pain, they can perform this exercise while lying down on the back over a floor mat, while extending legs upward.

4.         Kneeling Quadriceps Taekwondo Stretch

This stretching exercise helps in stabilizing the quadriceps muscle that forms the front portion of thigh.

Procedure:

Kneel with left leg forward and right leg backward (Refer to the picture). Try to reach back in order to get a suitable grip on front side of back leg. Now, try to bend knee slowly while lifting the front foot from the ground. It should be lifted closer towards buttock. Lift until you feel stretch across front of thigh and hip. Remain in this position for 15 seconds and then release. Repeat the same with your other leg.

Repetitions: 5-6 per leg

Precaution:

Be absolutely careful while doing this stretching exercise. Don’t ever strain the knees. This may lead to some serious injury.

5.         Lying Quadriceps Taekwondo Stretch

This exercise is extremely beneficial in stretching the quads as well the buttocks.

Procedure:

Sit on floor mat with left leg bent before you. However, the right leg should be bent opposite to you. Lean to left on forearm while keeping the abs totally engaged. With the right hand, try to grab the top of right foot. Now, try to pull heel gently towards glutes This is done to stretch the muscles of front thigh. Remain in this position for 15 seconds. Then switch back to the other end.

Precaution:

Perform this stretching in an extremely slow manner. Performing this stretching in a faster way can lead to muscle pull and strain.

6.         Standing Quadriceps Taekwondo Stretch

This stretching exercise is great to flexible the quadriceps muscle.

Procedure:

Stand straight. Place your feet in a hip-width apart stance. Pull in your abdominal portion and then relax the shoulders. Then, bent your right leg. Try to bring the heel towards your buttock. Now, grasp right foot with you left hand. Once stretch is felt, pause for 5 seconds and return back to the starting position. Repeat the same procedure with left foot.

For those who find grasping right foot with left hand a much uncomfortable position, they can use right hand for the purpose.

Precaution:

Hold on to a wall or chair for balancing. Also, perform this workout in an extremely gentle manner. Or else, quads may get injured.

7.         Lunge Hip Flexor Taekwondo Stretch

This stretching workout targets two major muscle groups: Iliopsoas & Soleus.

Procedure:

Stand in a lunging position but this time, with right foot far behind the left foot and vice versa.

While keeping the rear leg hips in a straight position, squat downwards in a chest-high manner. rear hips should be pushed down and forward. Once in this stretched position, hold for three seconds. Return back to the starting position. Repeat with other leg.

Repetitions: 10 with each leg

Precaution: While performing this stretching workout, it is necessary to wear proper shoes. A little bit of careless act can lead to hurting the feet as well quads muscle.

8.         Kneeling Hip Flexor Taekwondo Stretch

This stretching workout targets the Iliopsoas, Gluteus Maximus, Adductor Magnus, and Soleus muscle group.

Procedure:

Stand in forward lunge position on a padded mat. Now, position the foot in such a manner that it remains beyond the forward knee. Hands need to be placed on the knee. While pushing the hips forward, try to straighten up the rear leg hip. As tension is experienced, take a brief pause for 5-6 seconds. Return back to the starting position. Repeat the same with other leg.

Repetitions: 10-12

Precautions:

Always perform this stretching exercise on a suitable rubber mat. This will protect the knees from any sudden injury and will also provide a suitable support to the feet.

9.         Taekwondo Pelvic Tilt

Procedure;

Lie done on your back. Knees should be in a bent position while feet firmly placed on floor. Now, try to tilt the pelvis with belly while trying to contract abdominal as well gluteus muscles. Try to squeeze for at least 15-seconds.

Next, perform this stretch with body in an opposite posture, facing the ground. Tilt your pelvis in other direction while arching back and creating hollowness between spine and ground. Try to squeeze for 10 seconds.

Repetitions: 10-12 in each position

Precaution: Form is necessary. Perform it in presence of a suitable instructor.

10.      Taekwondo Split

This is a very similar stretching workout when compared to seated hamstring stretch.

Procedure:

Sit on the floor with legs spread in opposite direction. Refer to the second image. Next, try to touch the toe f right leg with right hand fingers and left with left hand fingers.

Repetitions: 7

11.      Taekwondo Segmental Rotation

This is an effective exercise that helps in strengthening the core muscles of lower region.

Procedure:

Lie down on your back. Now, create right angles in between hips and knees. Tighten the abdominal muscles. Try to control on your breathing. Slowly try to move the legs to left while keeping shoulders on ground. Try to go only that much that you can able to. Unnecessary stretch is not required. While stretching, if there is a feel of pain, then you may have gone down too far. It’s not recommended. Don’t allow your feet to touch ground. It is the core region whose support needs to be take to hold feet. Hold for 7 seconds and then return back to the starting position. Repeat the same with legs moving towards the right position.

Zen thoughts for the day – “We have more possibilities available in each moment than we realize.” – Thich Nhat Hanh

So set aside some time in your already manic day for some Zen time to benefit you and your horse.

 

 

 

 

Blown Away!

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Cautionary tale for anyone using a mobile field shelter on skids..

During the last week we have been experiencing some pretty strong winds. No doubt making for some interesting riding sessions!! Strong gusting wind and driving rain is never a favourite with me when everything has to be secured, belts and braces to stop tarps blowing off and escapee feedbags racing across the yard and spooking the horses but riding instructor Janine Lamy couldn’t believe it when she saw what had happened to her mare’s wooden stable. It had lifted clean up off its skids and blown into the next field, bashing into some trees and knocking down the perimeter fence.

“it was windy that night, but the stables have survived worse storms,” Janine explains. “it was more gusty and rainy, and generally foul. But the wind must have caught the stable at a certain angle and that was it.”

For husbandry reasons some horses are kept turned out year round but indeed even short-term turn out might benefit from shelter and this is often in the form of horse shelters on skids. Planning regulations mean that permanent stabling must be approved by the local planning office, but non permanent field shelters (i.e. those which can be relocated with a tow hitch and skids), fall outside the need for permission and provide a means of shelter from wind, rain, sun and flies for many owners and yards where horses are regularly at grass. Although the incidence of the drastic uber-mobility of Janine’s field shelter is rare it might be worth considering some form of anchorage that avoids planning infringements (it seems that non permanent anchoring is permissible – but please check with your local authority). One option would be to ensure that the entrance is sited away from the prevailing wind or the shelter is sited with the shelter of trees of another building to reduce the impact of the prevailing wind.

If turn out is important to you make sure you make a point of asking what the yards policy is when visiting the a proposed Livery or Training Establishment. If you are looking for livery and want your horse to be grass kept the safe siting and robustness of the field shelters provided would be a key consideration.

 For yards offering livery services on Horse Scout click here  

Livery for your horse

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Are you looking for livery for your horse?

We all want to look after our horses and keep them happy and healthy.

If you are not happy in your present yard or your circumstances have changed or perhaps you are thinking of buying a horse and keeping it at livery. Livery yards are built in every size and shape and generally speaking you will get what you pay for. So its important to consider what it is that you want to pay for and balance this against what you can actually afford in order to enjoy your horse.  Who, after all represents, for most of us, a sizeable percentage outgoing of any disposable income.

Here are some fundamental things to put on your tick list.

What do you need from your livery yard?

  1. What kind of livery are you looking for?
  2. How far from home/work?
  3. How much time have you got to give to your horse?
  4. What do you want to do with your horse?

Take the time to think all these things through, each as important as the next.

Livery – is a term used to describe the rent of services and facilities to house and care for your horse.  What kind of livery will very much depend on what you need in terms of care for your horse, and any time constraints you may have due to work or family commitments and of course your experience and financial situation.

  • Full training livery – An option for Sports and Show horses where a horse is ridden and cared for by a professional rider and their team. The horse will be trained and competed by the professional rider who is specifically training horses to progress on a specific career path.  For example Dressage, or Eventing, Showing and Racing and any other discipline which requires specialist training.
  • Full livery – your horse is cared for, fed, and ridden – the livery yard takes 100% of the duties in looking after and exercising your horse around your requirements.  For instance hunters who may require excersising, schooling and preparation for their owners to take them hunting maybe once a week or to come an dride when they are able but not necessarily be involved in the day to day care of the animal.
  • Half Livery – your horse has a range of needs catered for but not all i.e. you share responsibility for the care of your horse with yard staff.  The permutations are endless and can cover a variety of needs for both horse and owner.  Typical packages could be the yard will feed, muck out and turn out and bring your horse in but you are responsible for grooming and riding or maybe the yard staff tend to your horse at one end of the day or another, this may still include mucking out and feeding.
  • DIY Livery – the owner provides the infrastructure in which to keep your horse but you would be responsible for its care and exercise.
  • Grass keep – the owner provides a field which may or may not have a shelter and water.  Whilst you are 100% responsible for your horse and it should be noted that you are responsible for ensuring that your horse stays within the confines of the field, it is a good idea to establish who is responsible for the maintenance of any boundaries and entrances etc.

 

If you are looking for a training livery then where the yard is not necessarily the key directive, you will have chosen your yard based on the professional rider and their area of speciality for instance you may be looking for an event rider in the south west, or a dressage rider who has competed at top level to bring on your newly imported warmblood.

However for other types of livery will need to fulfil specific criteria depending on your personal circumstances.

One important consideration is how far will you realistically be able to travel if, for instance you are working and have your horse on half livery.  You will be responsible for a certain amount of time out of each day to devote to the care and the exercise of your lovely horse.  If you can find the ideal yard which is on your way or way back between two points then you will save precious time to spend with him, and with a few organisational tweak’s like packing your riding gear or boots into your car so they are always on hand means you wont have to return home before visiting the yard.

If you work or have family ties then another consideration should be given to how much time, realistically, you will be able to give to your horse and still ensure his care is as good as it can be.  Half livery is a convenient and generally realistically priced option if you want to be as involved as you can with your horse.

If you are confident that you have the experience and the time then DIY is a good choice, it is worth asking for recommendations, or talking with other clients and also checking out exactly what is offered with the service. i.e. does the owner allow for storage of hay and straw etc or are you expected to buy supplies through them.  Is there enough and secure storage for your horse related equipment.

When viewing any potential premises and their options remember to ask the questions that will establish whether the yard in question is going to cover all your requirements.  Spend some time watching the horses and the staff and ….quite importantly, the other clients who you may be spending time with if you are choosing half or DIY options.

Don’t just jump right in.  Make sure the yard you pick is going to make your horse and just as important, you, happy.

Top Tips for Buying your First Horse

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You’ve made up your mind,  you are going to buy a horse…

You know what your looking for; well roughly!  You are trying not to think of the cold winter rainy evenings and are focusing on the sunny balmy summer rides. You have sat down and done your sums and you have a budget and a sum you can ring fence every month to keep him and a savings account to pay into for emergencies and all those things you never thought that you would ever need.

Importantly you have worked out what size, shape, sex, ability, colour, age, confirmation, temperament, your budget and where you are going to look……yes! You have to know these things before you set out….well not the colour obviously because if you are thinking straight that is right sown at the bottom of your list –  NO? If it happens to be in your top three cross it out.  I promise colour is the least important thing on your shopping list, that and its name; although how many white socks it has and if it has a blaze can be important considerations-more on that later.

Where do I start? Top Technical Tips

Tipping the Scales – What size?

Lets work out roughly what size horse you are looking for -

  1. Add up the total weight of the horse, rider, and tack. Our eg: Horse (15.2 allrounder at 400 kg) + rider (Jo average 5’.4” and 70KG) + tack= 507kg (convert to lbs=1188lbs)
  2. Measure the circumference of the cannon bone midway between the knee and fetlock. Our example: 7.5 inches
  3. Divide the total weight by the circumference. Our example: 1188 / 7.5 = 158.4
  4. Divide the result by two. Our example: 158.4 / 2 = 79.2

 

You know exactly how tall you are and how much you weigh (methinks!) Here’s an average horse weight chart

Height (hh) Weight Range (kg)
9-9.3 – Shetland 200- 240
10-10.3 240-280
12 – 12.3 200-300
13-13.3 230-370
14-14.3 290-390
15-15.1 360-550
15.2-153 400-510
16-16.1 470-550
16.2-16.3 490-650
17.2-17.3 640-900
17.2-17.3 – Shire 850-950


…but…..and there is always a but! Some breeds have denser bones e.g. Arabs and Icelandic and New Forest Ponies which means they are able to carry heavier weights than others of a similar height and build.

Horses can be separated by build (height weight ratio) into light, middle and heavy weight and in the case of show horses “small” as well. This is not meant to be an indication of their present dieting regime but describes their build, and confusingly, this is relative to their breed types in most cases.  So, for instance, a light weight hunter (usually a ¾ or 7/8th Thoroughbred) is a well built, elegant horse of around 16-16.2hh capable of carrying around 12st.7lbs (177lbs/80kgs) including all tack and a bone size of around 8 inches. A middleweight hunter may be around 16.2hh, so slightly taller and have a deeper girth and a heavier build with a bone size of around 9 inches.

New Forest Pony breed guide says that a new forest is capable of carrying a stone for every hand and Shetlands are capable of an even greater height weight ratio.  However, if you are tall riding a small pony is not always very comfortable or elegant.

I think the point I am making is that TOP TIP One is buy a horse to make you happy and TOP TIP TWO is buy a horse that fits.  More pointers In TOP TIP THREE.

 

 

What’s the Problem?  

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Are you struggling with the way your horse is going?

Frustrated when you compete and time and again the same things happen.  Is it your horse or is it you? Working alone and never seeming to make progress?: its like working in a vacuum.  Let someone take the pressure off you.  There is a saying that a problem shared is a problem halved and there is nothing truer in the horse world.  Having someone on the ground to analyse your riding style and approach and the way the horse is going under you is invaluable. Finding the right trainer will revolutionise your approach and your enjoyment of your horse.

 Horse Scout has just the person you are looking for.  Click through and find yourself on the road to a successful partnership…

Matching the horse and rider

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Finding the perfect horse, the mine field…

“the blind leading the blind”

They say that horse dealers are worse than car dealers; and it could be said that in general one has to be careful when purchasing an animal and not a machine, owing to the nature of a creature driven by memory and instinct.

In spite of all the advice out there, time after time we still see bad matches between the novice rider and novice horse. The experience of an animal will ultimately dictate its stability, a novice rider should seek experience in the horse they buy, to draw confidence for them selves from that animal , not purchase a blank canvass which can be easily imprinted, scared, and ultimately dangerous, and become a situation whereby the blind is sadly leading the blind!

There are always exceptions to the rule, granted some young horses are stable, relaxed, adaptable, and safe. To increase the likely hood of a good experience however, the novice rider should buy an experienced horse that has already been routinely exposed to the tasks: cross country, dressage, heavy traffic hacking etc that they the rider shall wish to peruse.

Horse Scout offers a diverse range of schoolmasters. The schoolmaster will inherently be a horse over 7yrs, with a proven track record, often an affiliated record to give actual evidence for the experience therefore justifying its title. A schoolmaster should be a horse you can learn from, which responds independently and confidently when jumping, or performing dressage moves for example, the horse recognises its job.